Phoenix Real Estate with Historic Roots Now For Sale

November 20th, 2017 – Downtown Phoenix Journal

As part of the recent settlement of litigation between the United States and the Barron Collier Company, the federally-owned 15-acre parcel located at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and Indian School Road is now “For-Sale.” The land, which is located amid the booming Uptown Phoenix real estate market, is being marketed as the “Uptown Phoenix Parcel.”

The parcel was recently transferred by Barron Collier Companies to the United States for sale under an agreement that resolved Collier’s legal obligations to the United States dating back to the Congressionally approved 1988 Arizona-Florida Land Exchange Act – a deal that originally included the historic 72-acre Historic Phoenix Indian School site that had been operated as a school for Arizona Indian students for almost 100 years until its official closure by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1990.

historic,uptown,phoenix,real,estate,neighborhood,land,sale,agenrThe 15-acre Uptown Phoenix Parcel is located across from a light rail station, just one block south of the Camelback Road and Central Avenue, which was recently named by the Urban Land Institute of Arizona as one of the Valley’s most lucrative intersections for commercial and residential development.

Proceeds from the sale of this Historic Phoenix parcel will be deposited into the Inter Tribal Trust Fund and Navajo Trust Fund administered by the United States for use by tribes in Arizona to seed educational programs and services such as tribal libraries, preschools, childcare facilities, youth foster homes, tutoring and academic counseling for tribal youth, among other programs. Most of these programs have been placed on hold in recent years due to limited funding and uncertainty surrounding the future of these Trust Funds.

Many of Arizona’s current tribal leaders attended the Phoenix Indian School in their youth. When it closed, Congress made sure that the funds generated from the disposition of the property could be used to support a positive and enduring legacy for both the former Indian School, and the future of Indian education in Arizona. While the history of the Phoenix Indian School has been written, tribal leaders also look forward to supporting a new legacy that the sale of this long vacant property now represents.

“We are very pleased to see the that remaining 15-acre property, which is so steeped in the history of tribes in Arizona, will finally have an opportunity to be developed and hopefully become another Phoenix cultural highlight in the future of Uptown Phoenix,” says Inter Tribal Council of Arizona Executive Director, Maria Dadgar. “Not only will the sale of this property begin a new chapter for the City of Phoenix, the funds generated from the sale will also serve the future of Indian education in Arizona as Congress originally intended. Tribal leaders view this as a positive step in the history of the Indian School property,” says Dadgar.

The federally-owned Uptown Phoenix Parcel will be sold by a competitive online auction hosted by the Government Services Administration’s online site www.RealEstateSales.gov and will open for bids later this year.

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc., was first established in 1952 to provide a united voice for tribal governments located in the State of Arizona on common issues and concerns. Currently, ITCA’s membership includes 21 of the 22 Tribes of Arizona.

Historic Roosevelt Home 2017 Tour Explores Phoenix’s Rich History

The annual Historic Roosevelt Neighborhood Home Tour will be taking place Sunday, November 19 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Presented by the Roosevelt Action Association, this tour will feature many historic properties in Phoenix’s “first suburb.”

Craftsman Bungalow,Historic,Phoenix,Roosevelt,neighborhood,District,real estate

A perfect example of an early twentieth century home in Roosevelt Historic District

The tour will take you through neighborhoods built in the late 19th century to the 1930s, from McDowell to Van Buren, and Central to 7th Avenue. This tour will explore the history of the featured homes as well as the turn of the century architecture, including bungalows, Neoclassical, Tudor, Period Revival and Southwest Vernacular homes.

The Roosevelt Neighborhood was the first neighborhood in Phoenix to receive historic designation, one of 35 historic neighborhoods in Phoenix. It is considered the city’s first suburb, and was the home to several prominent early Phoenicians.

Learn about the residents, the historic architecture, and so much more as you walk down the 100-year old streets alongside towering, century-old palm trees and explore the rich history of Phoenix.

The Roosevelt Action Association holds this informative historic home tour every year to promote the understanding of Phoenix’s past, and to foster neighborhood pride. There will also be food trucks and a craft fair, making this a perfect family event.

The self-guided tour tickets are $13 through Nov. 18 and $16 day of event. Guests can buy tickets to tour guided by “hip historian” Marshall Shore for $22 through Nov. 18 and $25 day of event.

If you go:

What: The Historic Home Tour
When: Sunday, November 19, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where:  Between McDowell and Van Buren, from 7th to Central Avenues.
Tickets: Buy online through Nov. 18 or at the event on Nov. 19. Visit rooseveltneighborhood.org

The Historic Roosevelt Neighborhood is a modern name for a series of historic neighborhoods that grew North of the city between 1893 and 1930 and it spans from McDowell to Van Buren and from Central Ave to 7th Avenue. Every year, The Roosevelt Action Association hosts a family friendly and informative historical home tour where you can explore turn-of-the-century architecture (Bungalows, Neoclassical, Tudor, Period Revival and Southwest Vernacular Homes).

Train Depot Home Up For Sale In Phoenix

There are a lot of very cool homes in the Valley, but some stick out more than others.

north central,phoenix,historic,real,estate,historic,agent

Train depot home up for sale in Phoenix

In North Central Phoenix sits a home on top of a hill that has a unique history. It used to be a train depot in Mayer, a town more than 70 miles north of Phoenix.

The history is very cool. The train depot began operation in Mayer in 1898. It was in full operation until it finally shuttered in the 1950’s. For years it sat decaying to the ravages of time, but a Phoenix man named Don Dedera had a great idea: ship the depot to the Valley and turn it into a home.

So, in early 1963, the train depot was placed on a moving truck and shipped south.

It wasn’t an easy task. It was brought down the Old Black Canyon Highway and telephone and power lines had to be moved out of the way. At one point, the moving truck turned toward the Deer Valley Airport and was able to drive down the runway to avoid even more telephone lines. Eventually, it ended up on a hill and became part of a new home.

Fast forward to a few years ago, the most recent owner, Will Auther and his wife spent nearly a year fixing up the home, and they lived in it for nearly 13 years.

Now, they’ve decided to put it on the market. They hope that someone will take it over and keep the history of the home alive and help to keep the story of the traveling train depot alive.

Metro Phoenix’s Hottest Intersections to Live, Work and Play

Metro Phoenix’s Hottest Intersections to Live, Work and Play

Uptown Phoenix was a hot spot for restaurants, shops and clubs in the 1970’s and ’80’s.

Then the cachet fizzled a bit as the Valley’s suburbs boomed.

But Camelback Road and Central Avenue, the heart of Phoenix’s uptown area, as well as Phoenix’s Midtown area, are back as a thriving hub for popular restaurants, cool boutiques, office space, light rail and historic neighborhoods and their homes.

Downtown Phoenix, AZ Historic District

Central Avenue Corridor

It’s now the Valley’s most popular intersection, according to a new poll among real-estate and growth experts.

Urban Land Institute Arizona members recently voted the central Phoenix spot the “hottest intersection” in metro Phoenix. It beat out Phoenix’s Camelback and 24th Street, an area that garnered the title the last time the group voted a decade ago.

“Camelback and Central has old buildings with great design, diversity and very supportive neighbors,” said Craig DeMarco, restaurateur and a founder of Upward Projects, at the Urban Land contest last week. “It’s the only intersection in the entire Valley with four historic neighborhoods surrounding it.”

Camelback and Central didn’t even make Urban Land’s top 10 list for hottest intersections in 2007.

A lot has changed since then. A boom and bust, light rail and a move toward an urban lifestyle by more Valley residents have shifted our growth.

Plus, DeMarco’s group has opened five restaurants, including a Postino, Windsor and Federal Pizza, around Camelback and Central over the past decade.

Other rankings on Urban Land’s top 10 list:

  • Downtown Tempe’s Mill Avenue and Rio Salado Parkway was voted No. 2 in the hot-intersection contest. The popular urban hub moved from third a decade ago. Matt Mooney, managing director of Cousins Properties, pointed out that Tempe led the nation for filling existing office space with tech firms from 2014-16.
  • Scottsdale and Camelback roads came in at No. 3, after hitting No. 2 the last time. Real-estate attorney Jordan Rose, who has an office at this Scottsdale intersection, said people can shop, eat, work, vacation, get their hair done and even buy a Tesla at Camelback and Scottsdale.
  • Chandler’s bustling Arizona Avenue and Chandler Boulevard tied for fourth. Danny Plapp of LGE Design Build pitched the area for its $70,000 median household income, office space, new apartments and jobs. “A younger, richer and hipper generation wants to live in new suburbs like Chandler,” he told the crowd. “Just look at San Tan Brewery’s sales at this intersection.”
  • Phoenix’s 24th Street and Camelback intersection and the Camelback Corridor tied for fourth. The area is still a hot spot of offices, hotels, shopping and eateries but has a lot more competition now.
  • At No. 5 is the Scottsdale Road and Greenway Hayden Loop area, near the city’s popular airport. Danielle Casey, Scottsdale economic-development director, said there are often “celebrity sightings” at the airport and in the area. The intersection didn’t make the list the last time.
  • Downtown Phoenix’s Central Avenue and Roosevelt near Roosevelt Historic District ranked No. 6 after not making the list a decade ago. The area, known as Roosevelt Row, has recently emerged as a hub for new apartments, condos, cool restaurants, historic renovations and light rail.
  • Washington Street and Central Avenue in the heart of downtown Phoenix ranked No. 7, down from No. 5. The city’s many new high-rises are attracting more residents and offices. ASU’s downtown Phoenix expansion near Garfield Historic District is helping.
  • Gilbert Road and Vaughn Avenue in restaurant-rich downtown Gilbert came in at No. 8. The Gilbert intersection didn’t make the previous list.
  • Phoenix’s 44th Street and Camelback in Arcadia’s prime intersection made the list at No. 9, another new Valley area for the ranking.

Because of the tie, there was no No. 10.

Four intersections that made the top 10 in 2007 didn’t make the new ranking: Scottsdale Road and Mayo Boulevard; 95th and Glendale avenues; 99th Avenue and McDowell Road; and Price and Willis roads.

I thought DeMarco summed up the test for ranking metro Phoenix hot spots really well.

“We have restaurants around most of the intersections on this list,” he said.

“I don’t look at numbers. I just drive around looking for the coolest neighborhoods.”

To buy or sell a historic Phoenix Home, contact Historic Homes Specialist, Laura B. today at 602-400-0008. Read about Laura B. here from her client testimonials.

6 BIKE LANE PROJECTS COMING TO A DOWNTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU

6 BIKE LANE PROJECTS COMING TO A DOWNTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU

JULY 28, 2017 BY FARA ILLICH

garfield,historic,district,real,estate,coronado,willo,rooseveltRight now, Phoenix lacks a comprehensive bicycle network connecting the downtown business district with surrounding neighborhoods.

But a number of improvement projects aim to change that.

From road “diets” to restriping, the City of Phoenix is not only focusing on making downtown more bikeable, but more walkable and livable too.

Six projects impacting downtown are in the works, which will add things like cycle tracks (two-way bike lanes), landscaping enhancements, signage, lighting and ADA improvements.

Omar Peters, a director with the Urban Phoenix Project (UPP), sees the changes as a step toward making cycling as comfortable as driving.

“It’s exciting to think about biking this entire area and it’s a nice, easy, protected and pleasurable ride,” he said.

As the special projects administrator for the city’s street department, Mark Melnychenko sets up many of the community meetings advocates (like Peters) attend. Melnychenko gathers public input and helps lead the design and construction process.

“I think we’ve made some pretty good strides in what we’re doing with streets and transportation in the Valley,” he said. “If we had talked about these types of things even 10 years ago, people would not have listened to you, now it’s part of everybody’s vocabulary.”

“Complete streets” are part of that new vocabulary, a concept that emphasizes the importance of multi-modal transportation. In fact, the city just passed a complete streets policy on June 28, ensuring all transportation improvements moving forward have things like walkability and bikeability in mind.

EVANS CHURCHILL & ALVARADO

One example of that is the First Street Pedestrian Improvement Project, which started in 2012, and is slated to conclude sometime this year.

Big changes on First Street have already been made between Van Buren and McKinley Streets, including repaving, reducing the roadway width, widening the sidewalks and adding bike lanes.

Those improvements will extend through the Evans Churchill neighborhood up to Margaret T. Hance Park in the final phase.

Third Street is another major artery running north from downtown. And unlike 1st Street, which dead-ends at Hance Park, Third Street helps bridge the I-10 barrier from Evans Churchill into the Alvarado neighborhood and beyond.

Stretching all the way up to Indian School Road, the Third Street Improvement Project will impact a lot of central city neighborhoods. It already went through the public input process, settling on design plans that reduce the traffic lanes from five to three and add buffered bike lanes. Construction will begin in late 2018 or early ‘19.

CORONADO

Running east-west, the Oak Street Improvement Project will tie into 3rd Street, which links with Roosevelt and First streets, and the rest of downtown Phoenix.

It basically provides a walkable, bikable corridor through the Coronado neighborhood (and areas east of that), in addition to easier, safer passage across major intersections like 7th and 16th streets.

According to Melnychenko, the Oak Street improvements are a great example of how the city is creating one big bicycle network, while trying to keep motorists, residents and pedestrians happy.

“Everything we do with the streets is a balancing act because we have commuters, bicyclists, public transit — and we need to balance the use of the street,” he said. “We have go about it incrementally because it impacts a lot of people.”

Construction on the Oak Street bike lanes is set to begin in 2019, and will eventually tie into the Grand Canalscape near 24th Street.

So while many of these projects aren’t connected yet, they eventually will be.

ROOSEVELT & WILLO

For instance, there’s a bike lane gap between Central and 7th Avenues along Roosevelt Street — but that’s about to change. The street was recently redone east of Central Avenue (along Roosevelt Row), and now it’s the west side’s turn.

In addition to repaving and restriping Roosevelt Street, Third and Fifth Avenues will also get bike lane makeovers, possibly as far north as Thomas Road. As part of the lengthy pre-design process, which concluded in December 2016, key stakeholders provided input, followed by a three-day design charrette.

Because of the all the new development happening in that area and connection to downtown neighborhoods like Roosevelt and Willo, a lot of community members attended the discussions.

UPP was one of the groups present, pushing for cycle tracks on both 3rd and 5th Avenues, in addition to two-way traffic south of Roosevelt.

“When you think about all the new residential that’s happening, there’s a reason why these people want to move downtown,” Peters said. “They want that lifestyle and that includes being able to walk to places, being able to bike to places.”

GARFIELD

The historic Garfield neighborhood east of downtown is also growing, and a new project along Van Buren Street would add bike lanes to that area as well. Spanning from 7th Street to 40th Street, the initial design provides a road diet, buffered bicycle lanes and sidewalk improvements.

A road diet will be used to re-channel traffic, add bike lanes and achieve systemic improvements. While proven safer overall, diets can sometimes be a contentious issue for commuters, who don’t want lanes taken away.

But according to Dan Klocke, executive director of the Downtown Phoenix Partnership, it’s time to rethink that mentality.

“Cities originally widened roads so people could get to their far-flung neighborhoods faster,” he said. “It’s time to recapture some of the quality of life for those neighborhoods by reducing the impact of wide roads, and offering transportation solutions for local residents and employees.”

WOODLAND & EASTLAKE PARK

Using the existing roadway and curbing, a restriping project will also affect Washington and Jefferson streets — adding bike lanes to the gap between 7th Avenue and 7th Street.

Lanes currently exist just outside the “Sevens” going west toward the Woodland neighborhood, and east toward Eastlake Park. This would connect cyclists from those neighborhoods to the downtown business district, at no detriment to vehicle traffic.

“In a tight urban area, bikes get a lot of people around and cause no congestion,” Klocke said. “Bike lanes are an important quality-of-life amenity for those who enjoy it, but also a critical infrastructure piece for those who don’t have a car.”

Many of the projects impacting downtown neighborhoods are still open for public comment. For more information on how to get involved or attend a meeting, check the City of Phoenix website.

 

7 historic Phoenix landmarks that no one remembers

7 historic Phoenix landmarks that no one remembers

 by 

historic,phoenix,landmarks,real,estate

When the Central Avenue Dairy began in the early 20th Century between Central and 3rd Avenue, north of Thomas, the city limits for Phoenix ended at Van Buren.

They are all historic Phoenix landmarks. They were centers for the community long before Phoenix became the fifth-biggest city in the country. They have all been replaced by various commercial real estate projects, but they created memories for all who visited them. Here are seven historic Phoenix landmarks that very few people remember.

Weems Turkey Ranch

The ranch was built around the time Arizona became a state in 1912.  It was surrounded by a six-foot granite wall.  The ranch covered about 80 acres and was located at 7th Avenue and Camelback.  It extended from 7th Avenue to 11th Avenue to the west and from Camelback to Colter to the north.  The ranch house faced east and sat about 150 feet north of Camelback and 100 feet west of 7th Avenue. Weems had hundreds of turkeys and also had chickens, geese and goats. Most families in Phoenix at the time bought their Thanksgiving Turkeys there.

Today: The area is home to an LA Fitness, Fry’s and other retail shops and restaurants.

Central Avenue Dairy

The dairy began in the early 1900’s and ran from Earl to just south of Thomas and from Central to 3rdAvenue (about 46 acres).  We never were bothered much by the smell as there were less than 100 cows at any one time. 

Today: Park Central Mall construction began in 1955, thus ending the run for Central Avenue Dairy.Nearby land was also used to build St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

Phoenix Trap and Skeet Club

Located in Echo Canyon at the base of Camelback Mountain, the Arcadia Neighborhood, it was an ideal place to be.  The club was organized in the 1930s.  In trap shooting, the“clay pigeons” are launched from a single machine away from the shooter.  In skeet shooting, targets are launched from two machines in sideways paths that intersect in front of the shooter. The club hosted the world national competition for many years until 1952, when the club moved to Papago Park.

Milky Way Ranch

The ranch was a gorgeous place to visit — a giant oasis of 320 acres.  It was located between 20th Street to 28th Street and from Camelback to Campbell.  The ranch’s headquarters was located exactly where Trader Joe’s is today. The ranch was built in 1900 and closed down in 1950, but a nine-hole golf course was built on the site in late 1951.   

Today: In 1965, Town and Country Mall was built and it has undergone renovations and a renaissance over the past several years.

Sportsman’s Park

Sportsman’s Park was a 160-acre horse racing track. It had a huge white sign with blue letters that rose high above the entrance at the northeast corner of 7th Avenue and Indian School Road. It extended east to 3rd Avenue and north to Indianola.  The park was built in 1920. By late 1950, the racetrack closed its doors.

Today: The area is home to the entrance of the Melrose Historic District, a post office, fast-food restaurants and residential housing.

In this photo of Richard Kaufman taken at Cactus Air Park on March 18, 1951, the Mazatzal Mountains in Payson are visible in the background. Those mountains were 90 miles from the flying site.

Cactus Air Park

Cactus Air Park was an open area of 960 acres.  There was always at least three to five airplanes sitting at the northwest corner of the field. The airplanes did not have a closed hangar.  The area had no street signs until 1957.  All of the 960 acres were hard flat dirt without a single growth of anything.  This was due to the Borate compound the airplanes would spray on the field (Borate was later outlawed in the mid-1960s).  The confines were Shea to Cactus to the north and 32nd Street to 44th Street to the east.  Endless miles of desert extended beyond the confines.

Airhaven Airport

Airhaven Airport was built during WW II and was located between 27th Avenue and 35th Avenue just south of Indian School Road.  The runway ran 30 degrees northeast to 30 degrees southwest.  It was bordered on the southwest by Grand Avenue and the northeast by Indian School Road.  The Arizona Canal bordered the airport to the south.  The entrance was just before you got to the intersection of Indian School Road, 35th Avenue and Grand Avenue. 

 

The 120-Year-Old Clinton Campbell House Is Slated for Demolition

TUESDAY, JUNE 13, 2017 AT 6 A.M By Robrt L. Pela

Historic Phoenix Real Estate

It looks like Historic Phoenix is about to lose another old building. This one, the Clinton Campbell house, is among a handful of 19th-century homes left downtown. It’s slated for demolition later this summer.

Historic,Phoenix,real estate, Clinton Campbell House“There are only about 50 houses that are this old in the entire city,” says Steve Dreiseszun, a historic preservationist and one of the advocates of the Clinton Campbell house. “We think it could be adaptively reused and incorporated into a residential redevelopment.” The home, Dreiseszun argues, could stand “as a bridge to the past” as part of the new owner’s residential development plan.

Located downtown at 357 North Fourth Avenue, between Fillmore and Van Buren Streets, the 120-year-old house was built by Clinton Campbell, a well-regarded Phoenix builder. Several of Campbell’s other buildings still stand, and are protected by the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. These include the El Zaribah Shrine Auditorium on West Washington Street and ASU’s President’s House, a western Colonial structure built in 1907.

Glasir Capital Partners LLC, a development firm, paid $750,000 for the Campbell parcel in 2015. The sale included the house and two vacant lots on either side of it. Glasir planned to demolish the building, arguing that restoring it would cause “an unnecessary economic hardship.”

Following protocol, the developer was required to prove that financial burden before getting the go-ahead to tear down the former Campbell home. The company’s defense is hard to deny. Rehabbing the building would cost about $400 per square foot, Glasir reported, an exorbitant amount for an unassuming reclamation project. Real estate math suggests that a restoration of the house would cost $200,000 more than what the home would be worth on the market.

In March of last year, Glasir filed a demolition permit after determining the building’s age and significance wouldn’t keep them from tearing it down. A month later, the Historic Preservation Commission initiated a historic overlay, which usually results in historic designation and special zoning from the city. It’s a popular stalling tactic that can prevent demolition of a significant building while preservationists regroup.

But the Campbell building’s poor condition ultimately outweighed its value as an historic Phoenix home. The house has been damaged by fire and would require significant repairs before it could be moved to another lot, an increasingly popular means of saving old buildings here. Relocating the building would, the new owners determined, be too costly. Moving the house would require that power lines in its path be repositioned, another added expense to relocation.

The city offered no financial assistance in saving the building, having spent its 2006 historic preservation bond money on other projects. National historic tax credits weren’t an incentive for the developers, either. In the end, relocation and preservation of the building was going to top out at more than $500,000.

An appeal filed last week looks like a final attempt to save the house. “It’s not a lost cause,” Dreiseszun insists. On June 19, he reports, community members will present adaptive reuse alternatives to the developer and members of Historic Preservation.

“People say, ‘Well, it’s just one building, you should let this one go,’” Dreiseszun says. “But eventually we can ‘just one’ ourselves into having no architectural history at all.” 

Phoenix is One of the Fastest-Growing Cities in the Country

Mar 23, 2017

Eleven major metropolitan areas, including Phoenix, are growing at a pace of more than 1,000 persons per week, based on population estimates issued this morning by the U.S. Census Bureau.

phoenix,real,estate,2017,historicThe federal agency released July 2016 estimates for 382 metros and 3,142 counties across the nation.

American City Business Journals, the parent company of the Phoenix Business Journal, used the new federal data to calculate weekly growth rates. Phoenix landed at No. 8 on the list. The Valley’s population rose from an April 2010 total of 4.19 million to a July 2016 estimate of 4.66 million, translating into a net increase of 1,436.2 persons a week.

Topping the list was the Houston metropolitan area, which saw a net increase of 2,612.3 persons per week.

The Dallas-Fort Worth area was second with a weekly net gain of 2,474.6 persons. Rounding out the top five were the New York City, Atlanta and Miami-Fort Lauderdale metros, all with population increases larger than 1,500 persons per week.

The other metros above the weekly threshold of 1,000 were Washington, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Seattle, San Francisco-Oakland and Austin.

The analysis also identified 11 major metros that suffered population declines during the six-year span. The worst weekly loss was posted by the Cleveland area, which slipped by 21,646 persons between April 2010 and July 2016, a net drop of 66.4 per week.

Three other major metros experienced weekly net losses of more than 25 persons: Youngstown, Ohio; Pittsburgh and Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, Pa. The remaining decliners were Syracuse, N.Y.; New Haven, Conn.; Hartford; Toledo; Buffalo; Akron, Ohio; and Rochester, N.Y.

If you’re looking to relocate to the Phoenix area, contact Laura Boyajian today.

Arizona counties rank high as best places to get a mortgage

Home buyers looking to head back into the market in Arizona may do so in a state where it’s pretty decent to get a mortgage.

Historic Phoenix Home Grants

Learn How to Save Money When Owning a Historic Phoenix Home

A new SmartAsset.com look at the best counties for getting a mortgage finds those in Arizona among the tops in the country. Pinal County came in first in the state and No. 34 nationally.

The report looked at five-year borrowing costs for as a ranking measure, but also examined property taxes, loan funding rates and annual mortgage payments to determine a composite score.

While the state’s most populous counties, Maricopa and Pima, ranked well nationally they were behind the curve in the state, ranking No. 3 and No. 9 respectively.

The best counties to get a mortgage mostly reside in Florida, with six of the top 10 in the ranking in the Sunshine State.

Methodology

For many people buying a house means securing a mortgage. To determine the best places in the country to get a mortgage we looked at four factors: overall borrowing costs, ease of securing a mortgage, cheap property taxes and cheap annual mortgage payments.

To calculate the overall borrowing costs, we looked at the expected costs over the first five years of a $200,000 mortgage with a 20% down payment, including closing costs. We calculated the ease of getting a mortgage as the ratio of mortgage applications to actual mortgage originations (secured mortgages) in each county. We based annual mortgage payments on the annual principal and interest payments for a $200,000 loan in that location, using average mortgage rates in each county.

Finally, we ranked locations based on these four factors, and then averaged those rankings, giving equal weight to each factor. The areas with the lowest average rankings are the best places to get a mortgage.

RankCountyLoan Funding Rate5 Year Borrowing CostsProperty TaxAnnual Mortgage PaymentBest Mortgage Markets Index
1Pinal, AZ63.16%$76,932$12,606$14,78994.24
2Gila, AZ58.11%$76,932$10,586$14,78993.08
3Maricopa, AZ64.40%$77,437$9,638$14,78976.73
4Coconino, AZ62.61%$77,437$8,294$14,68876.70
5Yavapai, AZ61.05%$77,437$9,001$14,78975.54
6Mohave, AZ59.90%$77,437$9,166$14,78974.90
7Yuma, AZ62.26%$77,437$11,292$14,88474.74
8Graham, AZ56.77%$77,437$8,009$14,78974.13
9Pima, AZ62.13%$77,437$13,620$14,68873.28
10Cochise, AZ55.76%$77,437$9,981$14,78972.47
 AZ56.00%$77,370$10,134$14,775
Methodology

Sources: Mortgage Bankers Association, US Census Bureau 2015 5-Year American Community Survey, Informa, Bankrate, government websites, SmartAsset

Historic Phoenix Home Tours for Winter and Spring 2017

Visit historical homes in Revival, Norman and bungalow styles in the Coronado Historic District near downtown Phoenix in this tour’s 30th year along with Encanto-Palmcroft, Cave Creek and more.

Need a little inspiration to get your home and yard in shape? Home and garden tours are a great way to get home-improvement ideas while discovering new parts of the Valley. Check out our list, which leads into peak home-tour season in spring 2017.

2/12: 29th Annual Willo Historic Home Tour and Street Fair

English Tudor Home In Willo District Phoenix

An Example of an English Tudor In Willo Historic District

With over 900 homes, Willo is Phoenix’s biggest historic district. Once a year, Willo opens its doors to visitors with around 12 homes and the historic firehouse available to tour. The event also includes a classic car show, a beer and wine garden and a street fair with local vendors.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12. Willo Historic District, Third Avenue and West Monte Vista Road, Phoenix. $18. willohistoricdistrict.com.

2/26: Coronado Home & Garden Tour: Historically Modern

1930 Coronado Historic District Tudor

Built in 1930 in the Coronado Historic District

Visit historical homes in Revival, Norman and bungalow styles in the Coronado Historic District near downtown Phoenix in this tour’s 30th year. A street fair featuring local vendors, food trucks, bicycles and classic cars is part of the celebration.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26. Coronado Park, 1717 N. 12th St., Phoenix. $17 online, $20 day of; $5 for ages 5-12, free for 4 and under. thecoronadoneighborhood.com.

3/12: Cave Creek Homes and Garden Tour

cave creek, az,historic,tour,history,real,estateFour contemporary and historical homes will open on this self-guided tour. They include the Hamline Residence, which was one of the original five homes built in Carefree, and the Binkovitz Residence, a modest mid-century modern home. No children under age 12 are admitted.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, March 12. Cave Creek Museum,  6140 E. Skyline Drive, Cave Creek. $35 through March 6; $40 after. cavecreekmuseum.com.

3/26: Encanto/Palmcroft Historic Home Tour and Street Fair

Encanto-Palmcroft,Historic,District,street,sign,phoenix

Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District

This stately Phoenix historical district hosts a home tour every two years. Visit several homes and learn about their history. Once you park, a trolley will take you to stops on the tour and to a street fair at Holly Street and 12th Avenue that includes entertainment, food and local vendors. There will also be a 21-and-over raffle.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, March 26. 2102 N. 12th Ave., Phoenix. $18 advance, $20 day of. encantopalmcroft.org.

4/2: Modern Phoenix Home Tour

For those fascinated with the Valley’s mid-century modern architecture, this is a must-do event. This year, the tour explores Paradise Gardens. The event has morphed into Modern Phoenix Week, with talks, socials and other activities.

Details: Sunday, April 2. Tickets go on sale Wednesday, Feb. 1. modernphoenixweek.com.