Tag Archives: Historic Home Design

Metro Phoenix Starting to Grow Up Instead of Out

The Valley is seeing new inward development, a change from the outward expansion typical of metro Phoenix.
Mark Quinones/azcentral.com

There’s an urban revival going on in the Phoenix Valley, which has long been known for its affordable suburban homes.

Karen Wang is buying a condo in the new 14-story Portland on the Park development in downtown Phoenix.

Her new home is going up on a prime piece of land next to Margaret T. Hance Park that was a dirt parking lot when she moved here from the San Francisco Bay Area for culinary school 12 years ago.

Of course, metro Phoenix had plenty of empty lots back then. It was rated as one of the cheapest metro areas for parking in the U.S. in the mid 1990’s because it had so much vacant land, especially downtown.

Now, construction cranes and new housing, restaurant and retail developments can be found on many of those long-vacant parcels across central Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe, Mesa and Glendale.

The Valley, an area that for so long has grown outward with new, affordable suburbs, is having an urban revival.

For example:

  • Almost 4,000 condominiums are under construction, planned or were recently built in the central Valley, according to developers.
  • Upwards of 8,000 apartments are being built on infill sites in metro Phoenix, according to ABI Multifamily.
  • Infill land prices in the Valley have more than doubled in the most popular neighborhoods during the past 15 years, property records show.
  • Home prices and rents are climbing the fastest in the Valley’s urban hubs.
  • And the days of finding free parking on dirt lots in central Phoenix, Scottsdale or Tempe are as long gone as those vacant parcels.
downtown,phoenix,real estate,construction

Portland on the Park project at Central Avenue and Portland Street

Millennials and Boomers are behind the shift in metro Phoenix’s development. They want to live where they can walk or ride bikes to where they work or play — or both.

Builders are responding with many new high-density, high-rise condominium and apartment projects near popular eateries and shopping hubs. Not only are vacant lots being filled; older, often empty buildings are being transformed as well.

“I want a more urban lifestyle that wasn’t available when I first moved here,” said Wang, 39, who is moving downtown from the Arcadia area of Phoenix. “I am looking forward to walking just a few minutes to restaurants and the dog park.”

Her commute to her retail job in Scottsdale will get longer, but her partner, Logan Stephenson, works in downtown Phoenix.

Most urban planners support infill and high-density development because it uses less water, cuts back on freeway traffic and can create more walkable neighborhoods.

“It is a reflection of the Valley maturing as a metro area when the value of land closer in becomes more valuable and demands higher uses or basically more density,” said Mark Stapp, a growth expert and director of the Master of Real Estate Development program at Arizona State University.

“It’s a good thing for growth,” he said.

The Valley may never be Manhattan, but …

Phoenix will never be a San Francisco, Manhattan, London or Hong Kong for high-rise living.

The Valley also still lags other big cities such as Chicago, Portland and Denver for urban redevelopment. And growth on the Valley’s fringes will continue.

But metro Phoenix is already a higher density city than most people realize.

“Too many people equate the Valley’s growth with sprawl,” said Grady Gammage Jr., author of the new book “The Future of the Suburban City: Lessons from Sustaining Phoenix.”

An average of 3,200 people live per square mile of the Valley, according to the Center for Neighborhood Technology, a national growth think tank.

Gammage, who has been analyzing metro Phoenix’s growth for decades, said that makes the Valley a more dense area than Seattle, Houston, Charlotte or Atlanta.

Los Angeles is the densest U.S. city with an average 7,000 people living in every square mile. Second is Las Vegas with 4,500 people per square mile, he said.

But more condominiums and apartments are under construction or planned in the Valley now than any time since the boom. Most are going up in the central Valley on infill sites.

People often try out an area by renting, experts say. Then they’ll buy if they really like it.

“Apartments lead the way for condo construction,” said Tom Simplot, CEO of the Arizona Multihousing Association and a former Phoenix city councilman. “People first became comfortable living in that area, and are now converting to ownership.”

Rooftops following retail

Metro Phoenix’s typical growth trend has been reversed with infill.

Retail followed rooftops to the Valleys’ suburbs. But now new housing is chasing new infill restaurant and shopping hubs.

“Creating ‘high-connectivity’ hubs with high-density homes near restaurants, bars, shops, cultural centers and jobs is becoming the development pattern of metro Phoenix,” Stapp said.

Phoenix infill hubs include:

  • Downtown Phoenix, which has become a big draw for buyers, renters, eaters and shoppers. The area’s Roosevelt Row has several new condo developments, row houses and apartments. The Muse, with 367 apartments, is going up at Central Avenue and McDowell Road, a prime corner of the city’s skyline that has been empty for decades. Downtown Phoenix has the highest average apartment rents in the Valley.
  • Central Phoenix, where there are several restaurant hubs drawing residents and new infill homes. There’s the Uptown area around Postino, near Camelback Road, where high-end townhouses are filling the last vacant spots. One developer is transforming old apartments into Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired condos called the Mason.
  • Midtown Phoenix, where apartments and condos are going up among clusters of restaurants and shops across from Steele Indian School Park. In the Midtown neighborhood called the Yard, after the hopping restaurant hub on Seventh Street, home prices jumped 50 percent last year.
  • Phoenix’s Camelback Corridor and Biltmore areas, which have very few empty lots left for development. Now builders are tearing down older apartments to make way for newer, luxury ones because so many people want to live near the area’s luxury shops and high-end restaurants. New projects are stretching this chic area’s borders south.

“In the last 15 years the major urban cores of Phoenix, Scottsdale and Tempe have transformed to the extent that the population is now demanding planners make them increasingly vibrant,” said David Newcombe, a co-founder of Scottsdale-based Launch Real Estate and broker at Portland on the Park.

He said the trend for urban growth is being powered by “people wanting to take back ownership of their life.”

Suburban high-rises

High-density and vertical developments aren’t just going up in Valley downtown’s anymore, either.

If an area has a popular restaurant and shopping hub, then developers are building, believing buyers will come.

Pat and John Simpson are moving from their home in north Scottsdale’s DC Ranch to a new luxury condo at Optima Kierland. The 12-story development is going up on the Phoenix/Scottsdale border next to a resort, popular shopping and restaurant hub near the Loop 101 Freeway.

“We are downsizing but not downgrading to an area where we can walk to get a cup of coffee or a meal,” said Pat Simpson, a real-estate agent with Russ Lyon Sotheby’s who moved to the Valley from New York a decade ago.  “We want views and amenities.”

In April, more than 1,400 new and used condos sold, according to The Information Market. That’s the highest monthly tally since mid-2007.

“Creating higher-density housing like condos near central areas strengthens communities and provide people with an alternative way of living in the Valley,” said architect David Hovey Sr., who developed the Optima condos in Scottsdale and Phoenix’s Biltmore area and now is building in Kierland.

Kierland, where a 12-story condo building is on the rise, is among the suburban areas drawing higher-density housing. Others include:

  • Central Scottsdale, where the Old Town and the Waterfront areas are sprouting high-end condos and apartments near many upscale restaurants and shops. Condo prices are easily topping $1 million, particularly in the development replacing the Borgata shopping center.
  • South Scottsdale, known as SoSco, which is drawing Millennials to its new apartments and older neighborhoods with more affordable porch homes. Apartment rents jumped 20 percent in this area last year.
  • Tempe’s Town Lake and Mill Avenue, which led the Valley’s urban rebound. New developments underway on ASU land along the water will bring even more apartments and condos to the 24/7 area that is drawing not only students and Millennials, but Gen X-ers and Baby Boomers.
  • Downtown Mesa, which is drawing its first new housing developments in many years and becoming a cultural hot spot.

Moving in, up or down

Metro Phoenix’s two biggest groups moving closer in now are Millennials and empty nesters or Boomers, developers say.

These huge demographic groups seem to want to spend less time in their cars and taking care of homes with yards.

The Koch family represents both. Ann, 55, and Bob Koch, 59 live in north Phoenix but are buying a new condo in downtown Phoenix’s en Hance Park for their daughter Kayla to live in while she goes to ASU.

“We looked at renting an apartment for Kayla downtown and then realized buying could be a better deal,” Bob Koch said.

He said when their daughter moves out, the couple plan to keep the condo, stay there themselves and share it with family and friends who want to enjoy downtown.

Kayla Koch, 21, said she will walk to class and take light rail to her job in Uptown Phoenix at Flower Child restaurant.

“There’s these new type of ethos and feeling about living in an area where you can walk to a park, so many restaurants, museums and things to do,” said Aaron Carter, broker for en Hance. “More people are letting go of the trappings of a larger home to be in a great location, particularly if it’s near light rail.”

Ride it, and you might like it

downtown phoenix,light rail

Metro Phoenix Light Rail

Some may question whether light rail has drawn enough riders to be considered a success, but few dispute the train tracks have drawn development and created new Valley growth hubs.

Several of the Valley’s most popular new restaurant and shopping areas stretch along light rail from Midtown Phoenix to downtown and out to Tempe and Mesa. Housing has followed the train.

Some planners expect to see similar hot spots for development in Glendale as light rail expands there.

Light rail helped draw Adrian Zaragoza to downtown Phoenix.

He had been living in north Phoenix and found himself driving everywhere, including to central Phoenix to hang out with friends.

Five years ago, he began renting on Roosevelt Row. Now, he’s buying a condo at Portland on the Park.

portland on the park,central phoenix

“Downtown is great. I can either bike or take the train wherever I want to go,” said Zaragoza, 29, a senior financial manager in Tempe. “I only drive my car to go to work.”

Patricia Gober, interim director of ASU’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, said light rail has helped change metro Phoenix’s growth pattern.

“Light rail has created places where people feel like they belong and want to be in the Valley,” she said. “Phoenix is becoming more dense and poised for better growth, thanks in part to its trains.”

Density means less water usage

Urban planners say one of the biggest benefits from higher density housing is how it improves water conservation. Most infill developments use much less water than traditional neighborhoods with single-family homes.

“A very rough but conservative estimate would be that a typical high-rise household would use at least 50 percent less water than a typical single-family home on the Valley’s fringes,” said Sarah Porter, director of the Kyl Center for Water Policy at ASU’s Morrison Institute.

Based on several recent studies, she estimates a metro Phoenix high-rise home uses an average 4,000 to 5,000 gallons of water a month.

That means a Valley single-family home with a yard uses an average 8,000 to 10,000 of gallons of water each month.

“In the Valley, up to 70 percent of household water goes to outdoor uses, though the average percentage per household has been declining,” Porter said.

Water usage is an important growth factor for cities in the West like Phoenix dealing with shortages and long-term droughts.

But not all urban planners think a big shift to infill development is the right growth path for the Valley.

“Areas with high-dense housing and vibrant downtowns like San Francisco, Paris and Manhattan are unaffordable for most people,” said Joel Kotkin, executive director of the Center for Opportunity Urbanism. His most recent book is “The Human City. Urbanism for the Rest of Us.”

He said metro Phoenix’s big draw for new residents is relatively inexpensive housing.

“Affordable cities like Phoenix are now drawing Millennials and families who can’t afford to live in Southern California or on the East Coast,” he said. “I am not sure those people are looking for more expensive high-rise developments in the desert.”

But Gammage and Stapp said they think there’s demand for both infill and high-rise homes as well as more affordable single-family houses farther out in the Valley.

“Not all future growth will occur in the Valley’s core,” Stapp said. “We will need to build on the edges, but more dense regional hubs can also evolve in Gilbert, Mesa, Chandler and other suburbs.”

Density appeals to Wang, who the Bay Area transplant who is moving to downtown Phoenix.

“Part of my pessimism about living in the greater Phoenix area is that I’ve always felt like it was a large suburb due to the sprawl,” she said. “But the growth of Phoenix has dynamically changed in the past five years.”

She said it’s tough to compare Phoenix to San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles for downtowns.

“But Phoenix can be Phoenix, and it has changed over the years,” she said. “I am happy about the attention and renewal being brought to the heart of the city.”

Cheery Lynn Historic District In Downtown Phoenix, Arizona

Cheery Lynn Historic District In Phoenix

Cheery Lynn Historic District Home. English and Tudor Revival styles were the dominant styles through 1930.

Cheery Lynn Historic District is roughly bounded by Flower Street to the north, Earll Drive to the south, Randolph Road on the west, and 16th Street on the east. 

Cheery Lynn Historic Homes For Sale

One of the best kept little secrets of Central Phoenix is the Cheery Lynn Neighborhood. When you step off of the hustle and bustle of 16th Street, it is almost like being transformed back in time as you’ll find people pushing strollers, walking dogs, jogging, skating, riding bikes and enjoying a porch party with their neighbors. A great diversity exists among the individuals and families that live in this neighborhood. Some are relatively new, while others have lived here since childhood.

The Greater Cheery Lynn Neighborhood Association was established in 2003. Cheery Lynn was remote from downtown Phoenix when the first home was built in 1928. On January 28, 1928, a tract of land described as Lot 1 Beverly Heights was subdivided under the name of Cheery Lynn. This neighborhood is more than 85 years old!

The Architectural Styles and Square Footage of the homes in the Cheery Lynn Historic District vary widely from around 1,000-1,350 square feet with 2-bedrooms on average. But, the 1940’s Ranch-Style homes can get to 3,000 square feet and have at least 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. You’ll even find a few 2-story homes here. A nice variety with one of the most diverse, one-of-a-kind homes exist in this perfectly manicured, story book neighborhood.

All homes a very unique to each other with English Tudors and Cottage style homes built in the 1920’s and 1930’s. A few stunners of Spanish and Mediterranean-style homes add an incredible flavor to this classic central Phoenix neighborhood. The homes built post-WWII are modest, French Provincial Ranches

If you like Cheery Lynn, you’ll also like Woodlea Historic District or Yaple Park

Read the history of Cheery Lynn Historic District

Homes For Sale In Cheery Lynn Historic District

Coronado Historic District In Central Phoenix

CORONADO HISTORIC DISTRICT

Coronado Historic Bungalow

1935 Coronado Historic District Home

Coronado Historic District in Central Phoenix boundaries are roughly Virginia Avenue to Coronado Road, 8th Street to 14th Street. It houses one of the largest city parks being Coronado Park at 12th Street & Palm Lane.

Coronado is walking distance to loads of unique, independently owned restaurants, coffee shops, cafes and shops.

Coronado Historic District Homes For Sale

Fun Facts: The Coronado Historic District covers a bit more than a half square mile. It was designated historic in November, 1986.

Coronado Historic District in Phoenix is another Arizona neighborhood to land on the Best Old House Neighborhoods List for 2010 by This Old House.

Architectural Styles and Square Footage: 

1920’s Tudor’s, Craftsman Bungalows and 1940’s Ranch homes with two bedrooms and one bathroom from 700 square feet to about 1,000 square feet are the dominant home sizes in Coronado but it’s certainly not limited to that as you can find a wide variety of homes with 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms ranging from around 1,200-1,500 square feet. terrific wide porches and decent lot sizes with mature trees make Coronado homes ideal for entertaining.

If you like Coronado, you’ll want to check out Country Club Park and Brentwood Historic Districts.

From This Old House:
Coronado Historic District, Phoenix

Once Phoenix had ensured its long-term survival by damming up the Salt River in the early 1900’s, developers got down to the business of plotting the future of the growing Southwestern city, and that future was all about suburbs.

By 1920 one of the largest was the Coronado neighborhood, home to a middle-class population of merchants, policemen, and railroad engineers living in modest bungalows and Tudor Revival cottages, many fronted by small lots with towering palm trees.

These days the neighborhood is drawing a young, artsy crowd, who like to hang out on their front porches and wave to neighbors who pass by. The neighborhood was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Each spring, residents show off their homes—and often their DIY handiwork—during an annual house tour and community festival.

The Houses In Coronado

Small to medium-size Tudor, Craftsman, and Ranch houses, built from about 1920 to 1940, are predominant. Prices start at around $150,000 – $175,000. Houses often include a freestanding garage out back with matching architectural details. During the Great Depression, many residents converted their garage into an apartment, moved in, and rented their home.

Why Buy Now?

The neighborhood’s affordability is outstanding. And while there are still a few dilapidated houses, most are in pretty good shape. Buy a house here and all you’ll need to do is pick out the furniture and add a fresh coat of paint.

Among the best for: Bargains, City Life, Easy Commute, First-Time Home Buyers, Singles.

Coronado Historic District Homes For Sale

Read the History of Coronado Historic District

North Encanto Historic District In Central Phoenix

NORTH ENCANTO HISTORIC DISTRICT

The purpose of North Encanto Neighborhood Association (NENA) is to preserve & enhance the historic character of the North Encanto Neighborhood & to improve the quality of life for its residents  by creating a safe, vibrant & engaged community. Period of Significance: 1939-1956.

French Provincial Ranch North Encanto

A 1947 French Provincial Ranch In North Encanto

North Encanto Historic District is generally bounded by 19th Avenue on the West, 15th Avenue on the East, Thomas Road on the South, and Osborn Road on the North housing almost one square mile of historic homes. This neighborhood is close to freeways, I-17, I-10, a very short drive to downtown Phoenix and even a shorter drive (or walkable) to the light rail. There are 456 homes in this this district. North Encanto illustrates the residential development trends of the 1939 -1956 period.

North Encanto is my personal, current historic district residence. I can tell you first hand that it is one of the most wonderful historic districts this city has to offer! On a daily basis, you’ll see residents walking their dogs, walking with their kids (and more dogs), jogging, playing and just hanging out for a good, friendly chat. So many of us neighbors know each other and continue to get to know each other. We have many neighborhood functions from Groundhog Day parties, Christmas & New Year’s gatherings, Halloween parties, joint neighborhood block yard sales and a bunch of other street festivities where we actually block off a street while food vendors attend along with our local fire fighters and more. Games are played by all the wonderful children while the adults hang out, laugh, eat, drink and get to know each other more & more. We look out for one another, watch each others pets, homes and whatever is needed and wanted which keeps a tight knit community.

North Encanto Historic District Homes For Sale

Architectural Styles and Square Footage: North Encanto is red brick heaven loaded with 1940’s and 1950’s Mediterranean Ranch Style Homes, Mid-Century Ranches ranging from less than 1,000 square feet to 2,800 square feet. This district is predominantly comprised of Transitional Ranch-style houses with the largest concentration of intact Transitional/Early Ranch-style homes in metropolitan Phoenix, perhaps even in all of Arizona. But, there are also has a variety of Pueblo Revivals plus three Art Moderne homes. Many of these gorgeous homes have 1 to 2 car detached garages, detached studios, guest houses and lot sizes with room to make it your own. Many of these homes still boast the 2-color, original tile combo with colors that you just don’t see anymore like peach and black, pink and black, powder blue and black, pink and green and peach and green. There are also many, many homes here that have extremely modern interiors while keeping historic integrity. These are must see homes.

If you like North Encanto, you’ll probably like Campus Vista Historic District which is just east of 15th Avenue, Del Norte Place near 15th Avenue and Encanto Blvd., and, Country Club Park Historic District near 7th Street and Thomas Road.

Homes For Sale In North Encanto Historic District

History of North Encanto Historic District

Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District In Central Phoenix

ENCANTO-PALMCROFT HISTORIC DISTRICT

Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District runs from Seventh to 15th Avenues, and McDowell Road to the Encanto Park and Golf Course. It was recently ranked the wealthiest neighborhood in Phoenix.

Encanto-Palmcroft Homes For Sale

Encanto-Palmcroft Today

Encanto Palmcroft Historic DIstricrt Home Phoenix

A stunning example of an Encanto-Palmcroft Historic Home In Phoenix

Encanto-Palmcroft is one of Phoenix’s priciest historic neighborhoods. Fortunately for those who like to fawn over early-20th-century Tudors and colonial call-backs, a walk through this European-style setup of abodes is not only open to the public, but also is absolutely free. Dating back to 1927, this (technically) West Phoenix pocket of 330 homes is situated along circular drives, winding roads, and the 222-acre Encanto Park. For newcomers and non-residents, this maze-like area is easy to get lost in, but you’ll hear little complaint from pedestrians who like to take in the suburban scenery. Here, well-manicured lawns and rose gardens highlight all styles of residence, from Pueblos to Ranch Revivals. Whether it’s a home tour, a film crew, or simply a nearby neighborhood dog walker, residents are sure to find their fair share of window shoppers in Palmcroft-Encanto.

Today, the Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District is still significant for its architectural diversity, picturesque homes and landscapes which are excellent representations of an early design philosophy which successfully integrated landscape and building. Architecturally, the district is one of the most important because it is an intact collection of the finest historic Phoenix homes in the city and one of the most desired historic districts in downtown Phoenix. Well appointed, designed by prominent early architects, built of high quality materials and distinguished by detailing and craftsmanship of a bygone era, the harmonious mix of diverse architectural styles in Encanto-Palmcroft create one of the most distinctive neighborhoods in Phoenix.

Architectural Styles and Square Footage: The Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District features a distinctive, wide variety of architecture like Monterey/Colonial Revival-styles, Spanish Colonials, Ranch Style, Tudor Revivals, Period Revivals, Spanish Revivals, Spanish Colonial/Ranch combos, Spanish Colonials, Mediterranean-style,  Contemporary American International-style, English Cottage Revivals, two-story Spanish Colonial Revivals, two-story Monterey Colonial Revivals, Brick Regency Revival-styles, Single-Story Regency Revivals, Two-story Brick Mediterranean-styles, New England-style homes,

These 1920’s and 1930’s homes in this vicinity have mature trees and well kept landscaping by proud neighbors. Combine this with a curving line of 80-year-old Mexican Fan Palm trees street side and you get some of the most beautiful and spacious historic homes in all of downtown Historic Central Phoenix!

Most of the estate like homes here flaunt large living spaces, swimming pools, guest houses and amenities not commonly found in many of the other historic Phoenix districts. From wine vaults, servant’s quarters and second stories, the homes are definitely unique & artsy. Many have large backyards and many do not. However, Encanto-Palmcroft offers other amenities. The neighborhood has its own security company, lingering sidewalks layered with dog walkers and stroller moms, Encanto Park which is one of the largest public parks in Phoenix, a highly desirable & admirable address, close & direct access to downtown life, walking to shops, restaurants & night life and a Hollywood type lifestyle right here in downtown, historic Phoenix!

Fun Facts: Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District – Period of Significance 1920-1939.
Encanto-Palmcroft was voted the 2009 Best Places to Live – Phoenix Magazine (May 2009) and BEST NEIGHBORHOOD TO WALK THROUGH (2015).

The Neighborhood Association is tight and offers many perks such as Its own security company.

Getting Around In Encanto Palmcroft, Getting Lost and Getting Home

To get a real feel for downtown Historic Phoenix, take a jaunt to the Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District but know that this jaunt comes at a price. Smaller houses and fixer-uppers in Encanto-Palmcroft (if you can find one) fetch about $275,000 on up, while more finished out homes attract urban professionals who have no problem spending $500,000 and up. This is one of the priciest historic districts in downtown Phoenix but there are SO many wonderful reasons why.

Let’s Get a Little Lost for Fun

I live 2 blocks away from Encanto-Palmcroft. Not long ago, I took my dog for a walk in the neighborhood as I adore strolling in the winding streets of this exclusive district. Well, to no joke, we DID get lost even though I’ve been through there a thousand times! From one Coronado Street to one Palmcroft Street to another…round & round we went. It was embarrassingly hysterical. Let’s just say both my dog & I got an excellent workout in that evening. Neighbors know their way around and they have no trouble spotting visitors (like me that evening) who look a little tired at the intersection of streets named Palmcroft Way, Palmcroft Drive, Palmcroft SE, Palmcroft SW, Palmcroft NE, Palmcroft NW.  Even though we were pretty tired, we never stopped admiring the gorgeous Bungalows, Spanish Colonials and Cape Cods as they just don’t stop reeling you in. The layout, not the norm for a downtown Phoenix neighborhood, keeps traffic away and creates much privacy in Encanto-Palmcroft.

Encanto-Palmcroft is an elegant, beautiful historic neighborhood near downtown Phoenix and is surrounded by other classy, historical Phoenix neighborhoods.

If you ever want to get lost for fun, mosey on over to Encanto-Palmcroft with your dog. Just be sure to bring lots of water.

If you like Encanto-Palmcroft, you’ll like Willo Historic District and Roosevelt Historic District as well.

Read the History of Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District

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Annual Coronado Home Tour In 2016 will Highlight Country Club Historic District

Sunday, February 28, 2016 is the 29th Annual Coronado Historic Neighborhood Home Tour from 11 am–4 pm. Start at Circle Park, 10th Street & Windsor, Phoenix 85006. This year, Country Club Park Historic District will be featured.

Coronado Historic District 2016 Home Tour

Coronado Historic District’s Annual Home Tour

From the Coronado Neighborhood Association Website

The Coronado Neighborhood Association welcomes you to a Picnic in the Park, the 29th Annual Coronado Home Tour. This year we will gather at Circle Park and enjoy food and picnic games surrounded by music, arts and crafts for the kids, a lively street fair, homes open for tour and the Coronado Classic car and bicycle show.

This year’s tour will highlight the Country Club Historic District, one of three historic districts in the Greater Coronado neighborhood. Country Club Park earned historic designation in 1993 and has a history dating to 1888 when Charles Orme filed a homestead patent for the area. Read the full history of County Club Park Historic District here.

Home Tour tickets can be purchased in advance online for $13 (including fees) or on Tour Day for $15 cash or credit. Pick up your wrist band (your pass to the homes on tour) and Home Tour Guide at the ticket booths on each end of Circle Park.

VEHICLE PARKING: Coronado is a residential neighborhood, so you may park in front of any home throughout the area and walk to Circle Park on Windsor Ave. (two blocks south of Thomas Rd.) between 8th and 10th St. Please be courteous of residents and do not block driveways.

BIKE PARKING: We encourage you to ride your bike to the event. There will be over a dozen bike racks available around Circle Park and in front of homes on the tour you can lock your bike up to. Just make sure to pick up your bike by 4pm if in front of a home or 5pm if locked up at Circle Park.

For tickets and more information, click here. Check out other historic districts in Phoenix, AZ.

9 am Kids Parade around Circle Park

9 am – 4 pm Fair, Family Festival and Picnic Games in the Park

80+ vendors, 10+ food trucks & treat booths

live music entertainment

11 am – 4 pm Coronado Classic car and bicycle show

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5 Huge Mistakes People Make Furnishing Their New Home

Hey, we know: Moving into a new home is exciting. Like, obsess over decor blogs and catalogs, binge-watch HGTV for eight-hour stretches, find ways to interject phrases like “open kitchen shelving” into everyday conversations exciting. So it’s understandable that you’re dying to start filling every corner with stuff as soon as you’ve unpacked your last box. Beware: Time and again, interior designers see overeager new homeowners make the same mistakes when furnishing their home. Big mistakes! Take heed and tread carefully into your new space.

Mistake No. 1: Buying everything at once
Of course, you want to make those empty rooms look like home, sweet home, pronto. So you whip out your laptop and go on a mad room-by-room shopping spree for every stick of furniture from coffee tables to your canopy bed.

But Mark Clement of MyFixItUpLife.com urges a completely different strategy: “Stop, sit down, get out a piece of paper, and plan.” Great decorating, he says, is about taking your time to think through the rooms. Make a list of what you need to furnish the whole house; then focus first on the two to three most important rooms—generally the more exposed parts of the house such as living room, kitchen, and family room. From there, proceed at a pace where you’re certain you love (or at least deeply like) each purchase you make.

It really is OK to take up to a year to decorate a new home. You’re going to be living there for a while, remember?

Mistake No. 2: Decorating around a legacy piece
It might be your mother’s armoire or that overstuffed chair your husband bought when he was still single, or maybe it’s a bookshelf you paid a ton of money for and wouldn’t consider tossing. Regardless, trying to decorate around some of these pieces will only cause you grief. Odds are they’ll push you into a certain layout or color scheme—even one that might be completely wrong for you or your new home.

I’ve personally been saddled with two wide, black Barcelona chairs for the past decade, creating a living room motif that is simply too dark and cluttered for the space. (Welcome to my pain.) What I should have done, according to experts, is place them in a different context (a bedroom, perhaps), sold them, or put them out on the street. Hello, Goodwill?

Mistake No. 3: Trusting your ‘eye’ rather than a tape measure
Professionals know that measuring accurately is a critical step in design.

“Measuring a space is imperative before you purchase anything,” saysHomepolish designer Will Saks. It’s not just a question of whether a piece of furniture will fit, but how it will look sitting there. “You need to understand the dimensions of a space so the scale will feel balanced,” Saks adds.

Everything needs to be proportionate to the architecture of the room. “While a large, overstuffed Chesterfield might look great in the store, in a tiny apartment it might end up looking like a fat guy in a little coat,” says Saks.

And always remember to measure doorways and hallways before purchasing large pieces. There are few things more soul-crushing (or, for the delivery guys, more backbreaking) than lugging a sofa up six flights of stairs only to discover it doesn’t fit through the doorway. Most companies will give you the minimum clearance you need for delivery, but it’s up to you to ensure that it will truly fit. In most cases, it’s the height of a sofa that is the key measurement, not the width or depth.

Mistake No. 4: Cramming rooms like a clown car
Take a deep breath: It’s OK to have some empty spaces and walls. You want to be able to move around freely without having to hurdle a cocktail ottoman. Granted, while Saks maintains that “how much furniture you decide to put in a space is completely dependent on the aesthetic you want to achieve,” if you’re going for a more sleek look, stick to a few key pieces in a room to create the feeling of openness. The same goes for artwork—one large frame can create an art gallery feeling.

Mistake No. 5: Looking like a page from a catalog or decor mag
Ah, it all looks so great in print, but in your home, it’s a different story.

“I know it’s tempting to want to buy everything all at once and from the same place—those catalogs and stores are styled so well,” says Saks. “But refrain from doing so. To me, the most interesting designs are the ones that are aesthetically mixed.”

His tips: Incorporate vintage or one-of-a-kind pieces into your space to make it feel personal and curated. Pair that spanking new sofa with a beautiful, vintage credenza. Shop for accessories and artwork on Etsy and at flea markets so that your home feels unique. Because as nice as catalogs look, ask yourself this: Do they look like a home? Like your home?

Courtesy of:

Rosie Amodio is a writer/editor who has written for brands such as Self, InStyle, Wetpaint, and The Nest. A native New Yorker, Rosie is obsessed with NYC real estate, though she dreams of living on the beach in Southern California

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