Tag Archives: Historic Preservation

A History of a Historic Preservation Advocate

G.G. George, the Phoenix author of the new book, “The Arizona State Fair,” has a history of preservation activism dating back to the 1960’s and remains an active voice in the historic community today for Historic Phoenix Districts.

districts,historic,phoenix,real estate,G.G. George,neighborhood,encanto palmcroft,encanto park,neighborhood,“G.G. George is the Energizer Bunny of historic preservation,” said Kathryn Leonard, the Arizona State Historic Preservation Officer.

Most recent, the Norton House and all of Encanto Park were listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This completed a project led by George, the president and founder of the Encanto Citizens Association, and the president of the Phoenix Historic Neighborhoods Coalition, to put the entire Encanto Neighborhood on the National Register, which was started in the 1970’s.

And these are only a few of her accomplishments.

“G.G. has always been an extremely valuable voice in the historic preservation movement in Phoenix and it dates back to when all of our historic districts downtown were considered blighted, and nobody wanted to live in them,” said Leonard.

Papago Freeway

George began her work back in 1969 when she heard the plan to construct the I-10 Papago Freeway was displacing residents from their homes. These homes were in the area known as the Moreland Corridor, located between McDowell and Roosevelt Streets and Central and 19th Avenue.

At the time, the Arizona Highway Department, now known as the Arizona Department of Transportation, was offering homeowners less than what their houses were worth so that they could begin construction on the freeway, according to George.

“The freeway fight spurred preservation awareness,” said George. “The homes they were tearing down in the Moreland Corridor were just as nice as this house, just as old and even older,” said George, referring to her home in the Encanto-Palmcroft neighborhood.

George was invited to a meeting by a group known as Citizens for Mass Transit Against Freeways which included a group of concerned neighbors who wanted to make a difference. George attended the meetings, heard the stories from the people who lost their homes, and wanted to help in some way.

“She really was instrumental in saying ‘Hey, these houses have value,’” said Leonard.

According to George, the people in this neighborhood had no idea there was anything they could do to stop the construction of the freeway until a few activists organized the neighborhood. Nearly 2,000 neighbors came together to express their dissent against the construction.

In 1973, a vote appeared on the ballot which determined the fate of the freeway. The Citizens for Mass Transit Against Freeways and preservation advocates won their first battle when construction of the freeway was voted down.

The Department of Transportation had to scrap their original plan for the Papago Freeway, which led to the development of a new plan of an I-10 tunnel under Margaret T. Hance Park.

Arizona State Fairgrounds

Over the years, George has worked on countless other efforts to preserve historic buildings. Most recent, when the Works Progress Administration (WPA) building, located on the Arizona State Fairgrounds near Fairview Place Historic District, was threatened with demolition, George supported the effort to save it.

George wrote “The Arizona State Fair,” a book that chronicles the history of the fairgrounds from its formation in 1905 through the Great Depression when the WPA building was built. George wrote the book “to stimulate interest in the preservation of the buildings and the grounds.” According to George, the profit from the books goes toward historic preservation efforts.

“I devote all my time, research, and writing ability to the [Encanto] citizens association who gets the profits from these books to carry on our work,” said George.

According to Jim McPherson, president of the board of directors for the Arizona Preservation Foundation, George was very supportive of this effort from both a preservation and neighborhood standpoint.

“We have been really appreciative of G.G. in undertaking that major project,” said McPherson regarding George’s book.

Moving forward, George said that she will continue to fight to preserve the integrity of historic districts.

“If we don’t understand the past we can’t even plan for the future,” said George.

Historic Roosevelt Home 2017 Tour Explores Phoenix’s Rich History

The annual Historic Roosevelt Neighborhood Home Tour will be taking place Sunday, November 19 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Presented by the Roosevelt Action Association, this tour will feature many historic properties in Phoenix’s “first suburb.”

Craftsman Bungalow,Historic,Phoenix,Roosevelt,neighborhood,District,real estate

A perfect example of an early twentieth century home in Roosevelt Historic District

The tour will take you through neighborhoods built in the late 19th century to the 1930s, from McDowell to Van Buren, and Central to 7th Avenue. This tour will explore the history of the featured homes as well as the turn of the century architecture, including bungalows, Neoclassical, Tudor, Period Revival and Southwest Vernacular homes.

The Roosevelt Neighborhood was the first neighborhood in Phoenix to receive historic designation, one of 35 historic neighborhoods in Phoenix. It is considered the city’s first suburb, and was the home to several prominent early Phoenicians.

Learn about the residents, the historic architecture, and so much more as you walk down the 100-year old streets alongside towering, century-old palm trees and explore the rich history of Phoenix.

The Roosevelt Action Association holds this informative historic home tour every year to promote the understanding of Phoenix’s past, and to foster neighborhood pride. There will also be food trucks and a craft fair, making this a perfect family event.

The self-guided tour tickets are $13 through Nov. 18 and $16 day of event. Guests can buy tickets to tour guided by “hip historian” Marshall Shore for $22 through Nov. 18 and $25 day of event.

If you go:

What: The Historic Home Tour
When: Sunday, November 19, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where:  Between McDowell and Van Buren, from 7th to Central Avenues.
Tickets: Buy online through Nov. 18 or at the event on Nov. 19. Visit rooseveltneighborhood.org

The Historic Roosevelt Neighborhood is a modern name for a series of historic neighborhoods that grew North of the city between 1893 and 1930 and it spans from McDowell to Van Buren and from Central Ave to 7th Avenue. Every year, The Roosevelt Action Association hosts a family friendly and informative historical home tour where you can explore turn-of-the-century architecture (Bungalows, Neoclassical, Tudor, Period Revival and Southwest Vernacular Homes).

Tuft & Needle Buys Historic Paper Heart Building on Grand Avenue

Mattress retail startup and Phoenix cheerleaders Tuft & Needle have purchased an historic and iconic building on Grand Avenue.

Owners JT Marino and Daehee Park bought a 6,000-square-foot building at 750 Grand Avenue, most recently known as the Paper Heart, a performance space, music venue, gallery, coffee shop and bar.

The building opened in the 1960s as a Quebedeaux Chevrolet, and was designed by Victor Gruen, the Austrian architect known as “the father of the American shopping mall.”

The Paper Heart was opened by Scott Sanders in 2000 and ran until the end of 2007. The space was one of the early participants of downtown Phoenix’s First Fridays art walk.

Steph Carrico and JRC, owners of the Trunk Space — a long-standing Grand Ave. music venue that has since moved— were involved in the Paper Heart as well.

Park and Marino heard about the space and its history from the Grand Avenue community, and decided to purchase it to preserve the building and the lower Grand Avenue corridor, according to representatives.

The T&N headquarters is across the street on Grand Avenue.

Marino and Park then established Grand Paper Heart, LLC in fall 2016 to purchase the building, which has a full cash value of $512,200, according to Maricopa County records.

T&N declined to disclose the purchase amount, and are not sure what they plan to do with the building.

“We just want to make sure while we’re investing in this area that the other buildings are preserved,” said company representatives.

Marino and Park were runners-up in the Phoenix Business Journal’s 2016 Businessperson of the Year.

historic,phoenix,homes,real,estate,buy,sellReal estate around Grand Avenue is soaring and many believe it’s the next Roosevelt Row where all cool things happen as part of Garfield Historic District and Roosevelt Historic District. Districts near Grand Avenue like Woodland Historic District and Oakland Historic DIstrict are still hidden gems with values increasing more rapidly than other districts. These districts border the core of downtown Phoenix and are walking distance to the State Capitol and other government buildings.

If you’re interested in buying or selling a home in any of these districts or surrounding historic districts, call Laura Boyajian at (602) 400-0008, a Historic Phoenix Real Estate Specialist.

An Inside Look at Welnick Marketplace & Liefgreen Seed Co. Building In Historic Downtown Phoenix

As downtown Phoenix anxiously waits to find out what the future holds for the renovated Welnick Marketplace and Liefgreen Seed Co. building, PHXTV offers this look back at the history of the 1927 building and the process of restoring it to its former glory featuring one of our own Phoenix agents, Sherry Rampy.

Big plans are underway for the historic buildings located at West Van Buren Street and North 4th Avenue, very close to Roosevelt Historic District. With the help of historic preservation funds and private investment, these historic buildings are being restored and renovated for public use.