Tag Archives: Live Downtown

Fry’s to Open a Full Service Grocery Store in Downtown Phoenix

Courtesy: Downtown Phoenix Journal

Fry’s Food Stores Announces New Location in the Heart of Downtown Phoenix

55,000 Square-Foot Full-Service Grocery Store to Join Proposed Mixed-Use Project

Frys Food Store,downtown phoenix,new,cityscapeFry’s Food Stores and RED Development today announced the popular grocer will open downtown Phoenix’s first full-service grocery store. Fry’s preferred location to build the new 55,000 square-foot grocery store would be on the surface parking lot bordered between Washington Street and Jefferson Avenue, located between CityScape Phoenix and Collier Center. The downtown grocer would be housed in a proposed mixed-use development that could include traditional and creative office space and residential uses.

With the recent resurgence of downtown Phoenix and neighboring districts plus the expansion of both ASU and UA downtown campuses, a grocery store has been long-coveted for this area of the city. New employers are opening up offices, including tech-focused companies such as Uber and several new residential buildings have been built to meet the demands of new employee growth, creating an even greater need for a grocer in downtown Phoenix.

“This just made it a lot easier to move to downtown Phoenix,” said Mayor Greg Stanton. “A new full-service grocery store will be a catalyst for more residential and neighborhood growth downtown for years to come. With RED Development, Fry’s and Kroger, we are gaining trusted brands with a long track record of success in downtown urban markets.”

Frys Food,downtown phoenix,cityscape,real estate,historic

The location of the pending development is adjacent to CityScape Phoenix on the Valley Metro Light Rail Line. Photo courtesy of RED Development.

“This has been over 10 years in the making,” said Council member Michael Nowakowski, whose district includes downtown. “As the member on the Council who has represented downtown the longest, I am excited to announce that we are finally bringing a grocery store to downtown Phoenix. I can’t wait to see this project break ground in my district.”

Councilman Daniel Valenzuela, chairman of the Phoenix City Council’s Downtown, Aviation and Redevelopment Subcommittee, added “A grocery store has been at the heart of creating a modern, urban, vibrant downtown, which is needed to help attract the top talent necessary for our economy to thrive. I am thrilled to join Fry’s and RED in announcing this incredible news.”

“As a former downtown resident, I know first-hand how difficult it can be without convenient access to a full-service grocery store,” said Vice Mayor Kate Gallego. “For residents who live and work downtown, especially those who rely on light rail and other public transportation, this store is exactly what we need.”

Councilwoman Thelda Williams has also worked on this issue for many years.

The new Fry’s Food Store would be conveniently located in the core of downtown Phoenix, in between major light rail access points and would also serve greater downtown Phoenix historic districts such as Garfield, Roosevelt, Grand Avenue, Warehouse, Eastlake Park and more.

“CityScape was just the beginning of the potential we see in downtown Phoenix,” said Mike Ebert, Managing Partner, RED Development. “RED Development is looking forward to continuing its planning efforts on this mixed-use project and bringing a Fry’s grocery store to this area is the next step in solidifying the stability of the downtown revitalization movement.”

RED Development and Fry’s Food Stores look forward to sharing more details in coming months as the project progresses.

About RED Development
A wholly integrated commercial real estate company, RED Development maximizes asset value and performance for its high-quality retail and mixed-use portfolio that comprises 34 properties totaling nearly 17 million square feet in 11 states. For over 20 years, RED has been a preferred partner for national retailers and investors. The company also works with third-party property owners seeking RED’s expertise in remerchandising and repositioning properties to improve profitability and appeal. A privately held company headquartered in Phoenix, with corporate offices in Dallas, TX, and Overland Park, KS, RED builds on its development capabilities as an active acquirer of existing properties. www.reddevelopment.com

About Fry’s Food Stores
Fry’s Food Stores is headquartered in Tolleson, Arizona. The company employs more than 18,000 Arizona residents. The 119 Fry’s Food Stores service more than three million customers each week. Fry’s has been serving Arizonans since 1960. In 2012, Fry’s was honored with the Arizona Fundraising Professionals “Outstanding Corporation” award for its community service and philanthropic efforts. The company also received “2013, 2014 and 2015 Top Company” awards. Fry’s is the only grocer in Arizona to receive Top Company honors. The company is hiring and looking for customer service stars.

Cheery Lynn Historic District In Downtown Phoenix, Arizona

Cheery Lynn Historic District In Phoenix

Cheery Lynn Historic District Home. English and Tudor Revival styles were the dominant styles through 1930.

Cheery Lynn Historic District is roughly bounded by Flower Street to the north, Earll Drive to the south, Randolph Road on the west, and 16th Street on the east. 

Cheery Lynn Historic Homes For Sale

One of the best kept little secrets of Central Phoenix is the Cheery Lynn Neighborhood. When you step off of the hustle and bustle of 16th Street, it is almost like being transformed back in time as you’ll find people pushing strollers, walking dogs, jogging, skating, riding bikes and enjoying a porch party with their neighbors. A great diversity exists among the individuals and families that live in this neighborhood. Some are relatively new, while others have lived here since childhood.

The Greater Cheery Lynn Neighborhood Association was established in 2003. Cheery Lynn was remote from downtown Phoenix when the first home was built in 1928. On January 28, 1928, a tract of land described as Lot 1 Beverly Heights was subdivided under the name of Cheery Lynn. This neighborhood is more than 85 years old!

The Architectural Styles and Square Footage of the homes in the Cheery Lynn Historic District vary widely from around 1,000-1,350 square feet with 2-bedrooms on average. But, the 1940’s Ranch-Style homes can get to 3,000 square feet and have at least 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. You’ll even find a few 2-story homes here. A nice variety with one of the most diverse, one-of-a-kind homes exist in this perfectly manicured, story book neighborhood.

All homes a very unique to each other with English Tudors and Cottage style homes built in the 1920’s and 1930’s. A few stunners of Spanish and Mediterranean-style homes add an incredible flavor to this classic central Phoenix neighborhood. The homes built post-WWII are modest, French Provincial Ranches

If you like Cheery Lynn, you’ll also like Woodlea Historic District or Yaple Park

Read the history of Cheery Lynn Historic District

Homes For Sale In Cheery Lynn Historic District

Coronado Historic District In Central Phoenix

CORONADO HISTORIC DISTRICT

Coronado Historic Bungalow

1935 Coronado Historic District Home

Coronado Historic District in Central Phoenix boundaries are roughly Virginia Avenue to Coronado Road, 8th Street to 14th Street. It houses one of the largest city parks being Coronado Park at 12th Street & Palm Lane.

Coronado is walking distance to loads of unique, independently owned restaurants, coffee shops, cafes and shops.

Coronado Historic District Homes For Sale

Fun Facts: The Coronado Historic District covers a bit more than a half square mile. It was designated historic in November, 1986.

Coronado Historic District in Phoenix is another Arizona neighborhood to land on the Best Old House Neighborhoods List for 2010 by This Old House.

Architectural Styles and Square Footage: 

1920’s Tudor’s, Craftsman Bungalows and 1940’s Ranch homes with two bedrooms and one bathroom from 700 square feet to about 1,000 square feet are the dominant home sizes in Coronado but it’s certainly not limited to that as you can find a wide variety of homes with 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms ranging from around 1,200-1,500 square feet. terrific wide porches and decent lot sizes with mature trees make Coronado homes ideal for entertaining.

If you like Coronado, you’ll want to check out Country Club Park and Brentwood Historic Districts.

From This Old House:
Coronado Historic District, Phoenix

Once Phoenix had ensured its long-term survival by damming up the Salt River in the early 1900’s, developers got down to the business of plotting the future of the growing Southwestern city, and that future was all about suburbs.

By 1920 one of the largest was the Coronado neighborhood, home to a middle-class population of merchants, policemen, and railroad engineers living in modest bungalows and Tudor Revival cottages, many fronted by small lots with towering palm trees.

These days the neighborhood is drawing a young, artsy crowd, who like to hang out on their front porches and wave to neighbors who pass by. The neighborhood was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Each spring, residents show off their homes—and often their DIY handiwork—during an annual house tour and community festival.

The Houses In Coronado

Small to medium-size Tudor, Craftsman, and Ranch houses, built from about 1920 to 1940, are predominant. Prices start at around $150,000 – $175,000. Houses often include a freestanding garage out back with matching architectural details. During the Great Depression, many residents converted their garage into an apartment, moved in, and rented their home.

Why Buy Now?

The neighborhood’s affordability is outstanding. And while there are still a few dilapidated houses, most are in pretty good shape. Buy a house here and all you’ll need to do is pick out the furniture and add a fresh coat of paint.

Among the best for: Bargains, City Life, Easy Commute, First-Time Home Buyers, Singles.

Coronado Historic District Homes For Sale

Read the History of Coronado Historic District

Roosevelt Row BID Proposal Faces New Challenges

Since April 2014, Downtown Phoenix Journal has been sharing the story of the developing proposal for a Roosevelt area Enhanced Municipal Services District, more commonly known as a Business Improvement District or BID. 

Roosevelt Row Historic Phoenix

Roosevelt Row, Phoenix, AZ

Over the past 18 months, the Roosevelt Row community has been engaged in the process of forming a business improvement district (BID), which would provide enhanced municipal services for the area. Though the proposal for the BID passed the Phoenix City Council in January, it is now in danger of being invalidated due to a bill that is advancing in the state legislature.

HB 2440 would essentially change the process for the formation of BIDs – not just in downtown Phoenix, but across the state. If passed, it would incorporate more government oversight into the process and would be retroactive to January 1, 2016. The bill is sponsored by Representative Warren Petersen of Gilbert and is supported by a group of Roosevelt Row land owners who oppose the formation of the BID. The bill passed the House this week and is now on its way to the Senate.

Earlier in the week, Roosevelt Row CDC sent a letter to Roosevelt business owners informing them about the bill. The letter is excerpted here:

Dear Roosevelt Row Business Owner,

As many of you are aware, the Phoenix City Council recently approved the formation of a business improvement district for our Roosevelt Row area. That vote gives us the opportunity to create an organization that represents us, the small business owners of Roosevelt Row, to collectively market our area as an evolving canvas of creativity. By forming this district we will be able to promote arts, music, dining and shopping opportunities which will increase business and community awareness of Roosevelt Row as a culturally diverse destination welcoming to everyone.

To be clear, the Council’s vote to approve the District is contingent upon us working together to develop by-laws and a budget which reflects our priorities in a fiscally responsible manner. Once those documents are completed the City Council will then review, modify, and/or approve what we submit.

While we are currently in the process of developing those items (budget and by-laws), a lobbying firm, which recently purchased a building on Roosevelt Row, is using its influence to retroactively stop our district from being formed and essentially prohibiting any future Business Improvement Districts from ever being organized again. Public Policy Partners, a lobbying firm owned and operated in part by lobbyist Marcus Dell’Artino, has successfully gotten a Gilbert lawmaker to introduce House Bill 2440, which would essentially prohibit any types of these organizations from ever being organized again anywhere in Arizona! And the bill is retroactively dated to the date our district was approved by Phoenix City Council.

Currently business improvement districts are successfully operating in Downtown Phoenix, Tempe, Mesa, Chandler, Tucson and Flagstaff – they have been highly effective in revitalizing these urban core areas by recruiting, retaining and expanding locally-owned and independently operated small businesses and promoting these areas as unique cultural, artistic and commercial destinations. They have proven to be powerful economic engines to spur business and job growth.

If you agree with the Roosevelt Row CDC and would like to voice your support for the BID, follow this link to contact members of the Arizona Legislature: http://www.rooseveltrow.org/save-roosevelt-row/

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DOWNTOWN PHOENIX LIFE

The City of Phoenix defines Downtown as the area between 7th Street and 7th Avenue, from McDowell Road on the north to Buckeye Road on the south. However, the majority of downtown development is concentrated in the smaller area surrounding the intersection of Washington St. and Central Avenue. Downtown Phoenix is one of a the few major business districts in the city and is the central business district of the City of Phoenix, Arizona.

It’s located in the heart of the Phoenix metropolitan area or ‘Valley of the Sun’ with a large variety of designated historic districts housing some classic, vintage homes attracting people from all walks of life.

Phoenix, being the county seat of Maricopa County and the capital of Arizona, serves as the center of politics, justice and government on the local, state and federal levels. The area is a major center of employment for the region, with many financial, legal, and other national and international corporations housed in a variety of skyscrapers. Major arts and cultural institutions also call the area home. Downtown Phoenix is a center of major league sports activities, live concert events, and is an equally prominent center of banking and finance in Arizona. Regional headquarters for several major banks, including JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, US Bank, Bank of America, Compass Bank and MidFirst Bank are all located within or close proximity to the area.

A Little History of Downtown Phoenix

Territorial era

In 1870, a meeting was held to select a town site for the influx of pioneers coming to the recently recognized town of Phoenix. 320 acres were purchased for $50 raised by popular subscription. This original site, the whole of the town of Phoenix in that day, encompasses what would presently be the Downtown Core, bordered by Van Buren Street south to Jackson Street, and Seventh Street to Seventh Avenue.

With the first survey of the new town, streets were laid out in a grid, with Washington Street as the main east-west thoroughfare. The north-south streets originally bore Native American tribal names, but were changed to more easily remembered numbers, with everything east of Center Street (later Central Avenue) named as streets and everything west as avenues. The town continued to grow, and was eventually incorporated as a city on February 28, 1881 centered around downtown.

Throughout the 1880’s the newly incorporated city made many strides toward modernization with the construction of one of the first electric plants in the West as well as the opening of the horse-drawn streetcar line. The Phoenix Street Railway system was eventually electrified and expanded to several different lines that connected Downtown Phoenix to other neighborhoods and cities in the Valley. Independence Day of 1887 heralded the arrival first Southern Pacific train. This opened up the economy of the young city, as goods now flowed in and out by train as opposed to wagon. As Phoenix became the center of commerce in the territory, the capital was moved to Phoenix, with temporary offices being set up in Downtown.

The city of Phoenix’s story begins as people from those settlements expanded south, in conjunction with the establishment of a military outpost to the east of current day Phoenix.

The town of Phoenix was settled in 1867, and incorporated in 1881 as the City of Phoenix. Phoenix served as an agricultural area that depended on large-scale irrigation projects. Until World War II, the economy was based on the “Five C’s”: cotton, citrus and cattle, climate and copper. The city provided retail, wholesale, banking, and governmental services for central Arizona, and was gaining a national reputation among winter tourists. The post-World War Two years saw the city beginning to grow more rapidly, as many men who had trained in the military installations in the valley, returned, bringing their families. The population growth was further stimulated in the 1950’s, in part because of the availability of air conditioning, which made the very hot dry summer heat tolerable, as well as an influx of industry, led by high tech companies. The population growth rate of the Phoenix metro area has been nearly 4% per year for the past 40 years. That growth rate slowed during the Great Recession but the U.S. Census Bureau predicted it would resume as the nation’s economy recovered, and it already has begun to do so. While currently ranked 6th in population, it is predicted that Phoenix will rank 4th by 2020. Currently it the 6th most populous city in the United States.

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