Tag Archives: Phoenix

Arcadia Home Once Considered for Governor’s Mansion Sells for $3.875M

A home in Phoenix’s Arcadia neighborhood that once was considered for the Arizona governor’s mansion recently sold for $3.875 million.

arcadia,az,real,estate,realtor,real estate,phoenix,neighborhoodThe stunning Arcadia home at 5105 E. Exeter Boulevard is a Spanish Colonial Revival estate and sits on nearly two acres of greenery at the base of Camelback Mountain. There are five bedrooms and four bathrooms.

Check out a similar 1926 Spanish, Pueblo Revival for sale in Arcadia right now by clicking here.

The Arcadia Neighborhood, centrally located near the core of Downtown Phoenix, shares a very close border to Scottsdale, AZ, is in the heart of it all. Click here to view Arcadia homes for sale and click here for all Phoenix Metropolitan homes for sale. If you’re interested in historic Scottsdale homes for sale, click here.

The property also served as the residence of Miss Kitty from “Gunsmoke” for 17 years.

It boasts arched windows, iron balconies, a Moreno tiled entryway and has a living room with an 11-foot coved ceiling. The fireplace is modeled after the one at the Phoenician while the former basement has been transformed into a 1,500-bottle wine room, wine-tasting room and large workout room.

The gourmet kitchen features light-colored slab granite, a commercial six-burner gas range, double ovens, double dishwashers, three sinks, SubZero refrigerator and a large walk-in pantry.

The grounds also feature numerous patios, a 42-foot long pool, 12-person spa and outdoor kitchen.

The approximately 6,400-square-foot property sold on March 20, 2018.

Central Phoenix Homes of all architectural styles, old and new, is part of what makes our Arizona city so appealing.

Read the History of the Arcadia Historic Neighborhood

Arcadia, AZ Today

Interesting in buying or selling Arcadia Real Estate? Contact long time resident and Realtor, Laura B. today.

Historic Phoenix Sees Major Rejuvenation ‘Between the Sevens’

Some of Phoenix’s most desirable neighborhoods to live can be found in an area that’s commonly referred to as “between the sevens,” which is the region between Seventh Avenue and Seventh Street throughout Downtown, Midtown and Uptown Phoenix.  

Home to historical neighborhoods like “The Windsor,” prominent office buildings and iconic retail centers, the area between the sevens is also becoming an increasingly attractive place to work and play as new commercial real estate projects take shape, blending modern needs with the area’s rich history.  

The latest projects range from adaptive reuse transformations of a former grocery store and other businesses into multifamily communities or trendy bars and restaurants. It also includes the modernization of older office buildings to meet current standards with lots of natural light, high ceilings, large open floorplates and easy connection to amenities.

Whether its people or companies, everyone is looking for a connected place that’s walkable, vibrant and linked to other amenities and uses, says City of Phoenix Economic Development Director Christine Mackay.  

In addition to providing great transit options such as light rail, buses and the Grid Bike Share program to get around, Midtown and Uptown also boasts incredible dining and shopping options as well as prime office locations for major corporate companies.  

Mackay says the rejuvenation of Midtown started in 2016 when Banner Health moved its corporate headquarters to the Banner Corporate Center on Thomas and Central Avenues.  

Banner retrofitted an old building, bringing it to the 21st century, explains Mackay, which signaled to other large corporate tenants that the area and surrounding communities would support regional and/or national headquarters.  

From there, the 2828 North Central building renovated its bottom floor to include a co-working shared space that’s currently occupied by Mod Phoenix. Meanwhile, the owners of the 2020 On Central building renovated all of its lobbies and shared spaces, which eventually led Facility Source to lease office space.  

“Those three things really set the stage for other building owners to come in and start making dramatic changes,” Mackay says.  

Now, Midtown is experiencing office renovations across the board because so many of the existing buildings were constructed in the 1970s and 80s.  

Mackay also describes an incredible and growing demand to live in Midtown and Uptown. “It’s cultured. It has night life, distinctive dining and pretty much everything is local. It’s exactly what people are looking for today,” she says. 

In addition to new office product and multifamily units, the area between the sevens has also seen a surge in new retail projects as it’s becoming more widely well-known as a foodie hotspot with an eclectic and tasty mix for restaurants and bars.  

Mackay says, “The restaurants, culture and nightlife is really what’s drawing people into this Central City to live.” In fact, she says, there are not less than 100 restaurants in that area for people to choose from.  

Mackay points to the success of projects like The Yard, along Seventh Street and Missouri Avenue, as an example of the pent-up demand for restaurants nearby, which has spurred other retail and dining destinations to follow like The Colony, built by LGE Design Build in 2016.  

Looking ahead throughout Midtown, Mackay says, the renovations of Park Central Mall is “the last missing piece before the area returns to full throttle.” Meanwhile in Uptown, she predicts, the completion of Arrive Phoenix will “really prove the market and show what a destination hotel looks like in that area.”  

ARRIVE Phoenix

historicphoenix, 7th street, 7th ave, historic,homes,real estate

DEVELOPER: Vintage Partners; Venue Projects 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Venue Projects 

ARCHITECT: Arrive Hotel & Restaurants  

LOCATION: 400 & 444 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix  

SIZE: 45,000 SF; 79-rooms 

VALUE: $20M 

START/COMPLETION: Q1 2018 – Q4 2018 

Located at what’s been called the Valley’s “hottest intersection” by the Urban Land Institute of Arizona, the project transforms a trio of mid-century gems into Uptown Phoenix’s newest dining, entertainment and urban hotel hub. The two-acre site will also host a boutique coffee shop, poolside taco bar, gourmet ice creamery, and nautical-themed rooftop craft cocktail bar featuring 360-degree city views. For the project, Vintage Partners teamed up with Venue Projects, the visionary developers behind The Newtown and other successful adaptive reuse projects like Windsor/Churn and The Orchard along Central Avenue. 

First Place-Phoenix

neighborhoods,historicphoenix, 7th street, 7th ave, historic,homes,real estate

DEVELOPER: First Place AZ 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: hardison/downey construction 

ARCHITECT: RSP Architects  

LOCATION: 3001 N. Third St., Phoenix  

SIZE: 81,525 SF; 56-units 

VALUE: $15M 

START/COMPLETION: January 2017 – March 2018 

The $15 million residential property for adults with autism and other neuro-diversities will be a first-of-its-kind facility that First Place AZ plans to expand into a worldwide model. First Place AZ Founder, President and CEO Denise Resnik started the nonprofit to ensure that housing and community options are as bountiful for people with autism and other neuro-diversities as they are for everyone else. The project provides a one-of-a-kind approach that combines apartments, a residential training program and a national leadership institute to advance more independent and community integrated living options. 

The Curve at Melrose

homes,historicphoenix, 7th street, 7th ave, historic,homes,real estate,districts,neighborhood

DEVELOPER: P.B. Bell 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: M.T. Builders 

ARCHITECT: Studio 15 Architecture Inc. 

LOCATION: 4333 N. Sixth Dr., Phoenix 

SIZE: 204-units; 308,618 SF 

START/COMPLETION: August 2016 – Early 2018 

The Curve will consist of 204-luxury apartments in a vibrant and eclectic urban Melrose District neighborhood positioned within walking distance of Indian Steele Park, light rail as well as numerous locally owned shops and restaurants. Included in the property’s luxury amenities are several that were selected by public vote in 2015, which include a resort-style pool and spa along with an outdoor kitchen and gas grills. P.B. Bell also worked with the Seventh Avenue Merchants Association on plans to reserve three display windows at the property to spotlight community-curated work and displays. 

The Osborn

historicphoenix, 7th street, 7th ave, historic,homes,real estate,neighborhood,homes,district

DEVELOPER: Trammell Crow Company; High Street Residential 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Chasse Building Team 

ARCHITECT: ESG Architects 

LOCATION: SWC of Seventh Avenue & Osborn Road, Phoenix 

SIZE: 190-units; 45,000 SF (retail) 

START/COMPLETION: July 2017 – August 2019 

The Osborn is a mixed-use grocery anchored retail shopping center and multifamily development. The project sits on a 5.96-acre site located in the heart of Midtown Phoenix where the city’s oldest Bashas’ grocey store, originally built in 1956, used to be located. The site benefits from immediate adjacency to many major employers, desirable affluent neighborhoods, abundance of social venues and high visibility with over 50,000 vehicles passing per day. 

Uptown Plaza

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DEVELOPER: Vintage Partners 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Kitchell 

ARCHITECT: Nelsen Partners 

LOCATION: 100 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix 

SIZE: 116,787 SF 

START/COMPLETION: 2014 – June 2016 

The Valley’s first retail center located outside of Downtown Phoenix is being restored to its former glory and street appeal as a result of wall-to-wall renovations over the last three years. The property’s renovation aims to restore this iconic shopping center — originally constructed in 1955 by the Del Webb Co. — to its stylish brick-lined, mid-century roots and appeal. The 11-acre renovation includes restoring the original brick façade, adding new landscaping and successfully securing a variety of local, regional and national tenants like Shake Shack, Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria, Huss Brewing Company’s flagship taproom, Creamistry, Flower Child and more. The latest phase included updates to the exterior of AJ’s Fine Foods. 

The Grid

homes,district,neighborhood,historicphoenix, 7th street, 7th ave, historic,homes,real estate

DEVELOPER: ABI Multifamily 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Alexander Building Company 

ARCHITECT: Corgan 

LOCATION: 5227 N. Seventh St., Phoenix 

SIZE: 16,281 SF 

VALUE: $3M 

START/COMPLETION: Q4 2017 – Q2 2018 

The two-story adaptive reuse project will transform the former Uptown Phoenix office building into a refreshed Class A office for ABI Multifamily on the top floor and co-working space on the first floor. A large multipurpose room will be used for entertaining, training and a yoga room open to the community. The design repurposed raw industrial materials, while still maintaining a sleek modern feel. In addition, a perforated metal canopy and second skin will be added to create new dynamic exterior spaces while protecting the building from the harsh summer sun of the desert. 

Dignity Health Third Avenue Parking Garage Expansion

neighborhood,homes,area,district,historicphoenix, 7th street, 7th ave, historic,homes,real estate

DEVELOPER: Dignity Health 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: JE Dunn Construction 

ARCHITECT: GLHN Architects & Engineers  

LOCATION: 2929 N. Third Ave., Phoenix 

SIZE: 177,000 SF 

VALUE: $11M 

START/COMPLETION: December 2017 – July 2018 

While the area’s public transit options like buses, light rail and Grid bikes have made commutes easier, parking is often a top-concern for companies and tenants considering a move to the Central City. That’s why the Dignity Health’s St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix is embarking on a campus-wide parking solution that will add approximately 500 new spaces. 

Park Central

districts,neighborhood,homes,historicphoenix, 7th street, 7th ave, historic,homes,real estate

DEVELOPER: Plaza Companies; Holualoa Companies 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: DPR Construction 

ARCHITECT: richärd+bauer architecture 

LOCATION: 3121 N. Third Ave., Phoenix 

SIZE: 337,000 SF 

VALUE: $57M 

START/COMPLETION: Q4 2017 – Fall 2018 

“Our goal is to transform Park Central into a truly innovative and exceptional work environment for companies in the ‘New Economy,’” says Sharon Harper, president and CEO of Plaza Companies, which also led the the successful transformation of the Los Arcos Mall in Scottsdale into the ASU Scottsdale Innovation Center – SkySong. As Phoenix’s first-ever mall, Park Central benefits from an exceptional location and unique retail history. In total, 337,000 square feet will be revitalized into several distinct districts, each with its own identity.  

If you are interested in a free consultation to see if buying a Phoenix home is a better option for you, please call or email me today. You may be surprised at what you learn. I have access to programs that offer down-payment assistance with money you do not have to pay back. 

Whether you’re buying or selling a home in Central or Downtown Phoenix, or just have some questions about anything at all in or about any one of the historic districts in Phoenix, I’d be very happy to help you! Just call or email me anytime.

A History of a Historic Preservation Advocate

G.G. George, the Phoenix author of the new book, “The Arizona State Fair,” has a history of preservation activism dating back to the 1960’s and remains an active voice in the historic community today for Historic Phoenix Districts.

districts,historic,phoenix,real estate,G.G. George,neighborhood,encanto palmcroft,encanto park,neighborhood,“G.G. George is the Energizer Bunny of historic preservation,” said Kathryn Leonard, the Arizona State Historic Preservation Officer.

Most recent, the Norton House and all of Encanto Park were listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This completed a project led by George, the president and founder of the Encanto Citizens Association, and the president of the Phoenix Historic Neighborhoods Coalition, to put the entire Encanto Neighborhood on the National Register, which was started in the 1970’s.

And these are only a few of her accomplishments.

“G.G. has always been an extremely valuable voice in the historic preservation movement in Phoenix and it dates back to when all of our historic districts downtown were considered blighted, and nobody wanted to live in them,” said Leonard.

Papago Freeway

George began her work back in 1969 when she heard the plan to construct the I-10 Papago Freeway was displacing residents from their homes. These homes were in the area known as the Moreland Corridor, located between McDowell and Roosevelt Streets and Central and 19th Avenue.

At the time, the Arizona Highway Department, now known as the Arizona Department of Transportation, was offering homeowners less than what their houses were worth so that they could begin construction on the freeway, according to George.

“The freeway fight spurred preservation awareness,” said George. “The homes they were tearing down in the Moreland Corridor were just as nice as this house, just as old and even older,” said George, referring to her home in the Encanto-Palmcroft neighborhood.

George was invited to a meeting by a group known as Citizens for Mass Transit Against Freeways which included a group of concerned neighbors who wanted to make a difference. George attended the meetings, heard the stories from the people who lost their homes, and wanted to help in some way.

“She really was instrumental in saying ‘Hey, these houses have value,’” said Leonard.

According to George, the people in this neighborhood had no idea there was anything they could do to stop the construction of the freeway until a few activists organized the neighborhood. Nearly 2,000 neighbors came together to express their dissent against the construction.

In 1973, a vote appeared on the ballot which determined the fate of the freeway. The Citizens for Mass Transit Against Freeways and preservation advocates won their first battle when construction of the freeway was voted down.

The Department of Transportation had to scrap their original plan for the Papago Freeway, which led to the development of a new plan of an I-10 tunnel under Margaret T. Hance Park.

Arizona State Fairgrounds

Over the years, George has worked on countless other efforts to preserve historic buildings. Most recent, when the Works Progress Administration (WPA) building, located on the Arizona State Fairgrounds near Fairview Place Historic District, was threatened with demolition, George supported the effort to save it.

George wrote “The Arizona State Fair,” a book that chronicles the history of the fairgrounds from its formation in 1905 through the Great Depression when the WPA building was built. George wrote the book “to stimulate interest in the preservation of the buildings and the grounds.” According to George, the profit from the books goes toward historic preservation efforts.

“I devote all my time, research, and writing ability to the [Encanto] citizens association who gets the profits from these books to carry on our work,” said George.

According to Jim McPherson, president of the board of directors for the Arizona Preservation Foundation, George was very supportive of this effort from both a preservation and neighborhood standpoint.

“We have been really appreciative of G.G. in undertaking that major project,” said McPherson regarding George’s book.

Moving forward, George said that she will continue to fight to preserve the integrity of historic districts.

“If we don’t understand the past we can’t even plan for the future,” said George.

Phoenix Real Estate with Historic Roots Now For Sale

November 20th, 2017 – Downtown Phoenix Journal

As part of the recent settlement of litigation between the United States and the Barron Collier Company, the federally-owned 15-acre parcel located at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and Indian School Road is now “For-Sale.” The land, which is located amid the booming Uptown Phoenix real estate market, is being marketed as the “Uptown Phoenix Parcel.”

The parcel was recently transferred by Barron Collier Companies to the United States for sale under an agreement that resolved Collier’s legal obligations to the United States dating back to the Congressionally approved 1988 Arizona-Florida Land Exchange Act – a deal that originally included the historic 72-acre Historic Phoenix Indian School site that had been operated as a school for Arizona Indian students for almost 100 years until its official closure by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1990.

historic,uptown,phoenix,real,estate,neighborhood,land,sale,agenrThe 15-acre Uptown Phoenix Parcel is located across from a light rail station, just one block south of the Camelback Road and Central Avenue, which was recently named by the Urban Land Institute of Arizona as one of the Valley’s most lucrative intersections for commercial and residential development.

Proceeds from the sale of this Historic Phoenix parcel will be deposited into the Inter Tribal Trust Fund and Navajo Trust Fund administered by the United States for use by tribes in Arizona to seed educational programs and services such as tribal libraries, preschools, childcare facilities, youth foster homes, tutoring and academic counseling for tribal youth, among other programs. Most of these programs have been placed on hold in recent years due to limited funding and uncertainty surrounding the future of these Trust Funds.

Many of Arizona’s current tribal leaders attended the Phoenix Indian School in their youth. When it closed, Congress made sure that the funds generated from the disposition of the property could be used to support a positive and enduring legacy for both the former Indian School, and the future of Indian education in Arizona. While the history of the Phoenix Indian School has been written, tribal leaders also look forward to supporting a new legacy that the sale of this long vacant property now represents.

“We are very pleased to see the that remaining 15-acre property, which is so steeped in the history of tribes in Arizona, will finally have an opportunity to be developed and hopefully become another Phoenix cultural highlight in the future of Uptown Phoenix,” says Inter Tribal Council of Arizona Executive Director, Maria Dadgar. “Not only will the sale of this property begin a new chapter for the City of Phoenix, the funds generated from the sale will also serve the future of Indian education in Arizona as Congress originally intended. Tribal leaders view this as a positive step in the history of the Indian School property,” says Dadgar.

The federally-owned Uptown Phoenix Parcel will be sold by a competitive online auction hosted by the Government Services Administration’s online site www.RealEstateSales.gov and will open for bids later this year.

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc., was first established in 1952 to provide a united voice for tribal governments located in the State of Arizona on common issues and concerns. Currently, ITCA’s membership includes 21 of the 22 Tribes of Arizona.

6 BIKE LANE PROJECTS COMING TO A DOWNTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU

6 BIKE LANE PROJECTS COMING TO A DOWNTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD NEAR YOU

JULY 28, 2017 BY FARA ILLICH

garfield,historic,district,real,estate,coronado,willo,rooseveltRight now, Phoenix lacks a comprehensive bicycle network connecting the downtown business district with surrounding neighborhoods.

But a number of improvement projects aim to change that.

From road “diets” to restriping, the City of Phoenix is not only focusing on making downtown more bikeable, but more walkable and livable too.

Six projects impacting downtown are in the works, which will add things like cycle tracks (two-way bike lanes), landscaping enhancements, signage, lighting and ADA improvements.

Omar Peters, a director with the Urban Phoenix Project (UPP), sees the changes as a step toward making cycling as comfortable as driving.

“It’s exciting to think about biking this entire area and it’s a nice, easy, protected and pleasurable ride,” he said.

As the special projects administrator for the city’s street department, Mark Melnychenko sets up many of the community meetings advocates (like Peters) attend. Melnychenko gathers public input and helps lead the design and construction process.

“I think we’ve made some pretty good strides in what we’re doing with streets and transportation in the Valley,” he said. “If we had talked about these types of things even 10 years ago, people would not have listened to you, now it’s part of everybody’s vocabulary.”

“Complete streets” are part of that new vocabulary, a concept that emphasizes the importance of multi-modal transportation. In fact, the city just passed a complete streets policy on June 28, ensuring all transportation improvements moving forward have things like walkability and bikeability in mind.

EVANS CHURCHILL & ALVARADO

One example of that is the First Street Pedestrian Improvement Project, which started in 2012, and is slated to conclude sometime this year.

Big changes on First Street have already been made between Van Buren and McKinley Streets, including repaving, reducing the roadway width, widening the sidewalks and adding bike lanes.

Those improvements will extend through the Evans Churchill neighborhood up to Margaret T. Hance Park in the final phase.

Third Street is another major artery running north from downtown. And unlike 1st Street, which dead-ends at Hance Park, Third Street helps bridge the I-10 barrier from Evans Churchill into the Alvarado neighborhood and beyond.

Stretching all the way up to Indian School Road, the Third Street Improvement Project will impact a lot of central city neighborhoods. It already went through the public input process, settling on design plans that reduce the traffic lanes from five to three and add buffered bike lanes. Construction will begin in late 2018 or early ‘19.

CORONADO

Running east-west, the Oak Street Improvement Project will tie into 3rd Street, which links with Roosevelt and First streets, and the rest of downtown Phoenix.

It basically provides a walkable, bikable corridor through the Coronado neighborhood (and areas east of that), in addition to easier, safer passage across major intersections like 7th and 16th streets.

According to Melnychenko, the Oak Street improvements are a great example of how the city is creating one big bicycle network, while trying to keep motorists, residents and pedestrians happy.

“Everything we do with the streets is a balancing act because we have commuters, bicyclists, public transit — and we need to balance the use of the street,” he said. “We have go about it incrementally because it impacts a lot of people.”

Construction on the Oak Street bike lanes is set to begin in 2019, and will eventually tie into the Grand Canalscape near 24th Street.

So while many of these projects aren’t connected yet, they eventually will be.

ROOSEVELT & WILLO

For instance, there’s a bike lane gap between Central and 7th Avenues along Roosevelt Street — but that’s about to change. The street was recently redone east of Central Avenue (along Roosevelt Row), and now it’s the west side’s turn.

In addition to repaving and restriping Roosevelt Street, Third and Fifth Avenues will also get bike lane makeovers, possibly as far north as Thomas Road. As part of the lengthy pre-design process, which concluded in December 2016, key stakeholders provided input, followed by a three-day design charrette.

Because of the all the new development happening in that area and connection to downtown neighborhoods like Roosevelt and Willo, a lot of community members attended the discussions.

UPP was one of the groups present, pushing for cycle tracks on both 3rd and 5th Avenues, in addition to two-way traffic south of Roosevelt.

“When you think about all the new residential that’s happening, there’s a reason why these people want to move downtown,” Peters said. “They want that lifestyle and that includes being able to walk to places, being able to bike to places.”

GARFIELD

The historic Garfield neighborhood east of downtown is also growing, and a new project along Van Buren Street would add bike lanes to that area as well. Spanning from 7th Street to 40th Street, the initial design provides a road diet, buffered bicycle lanes and sidewalk improvements.

A road diet will be used to re-channel traffic, add bike lanes and achieve systemic improvements. While proven safer overall, diets can sometimes be a contentious issue for commuters, who don’t want lanes taken away.

But according to Dan Klocke, executive director of the Downtown Phoenix Partnership, it’s time to rethink that mentality.

“Cities originally widened roads so people could get to their far-flung neighborhoods faster,” he said. “It’s time to recapture some of the quality of life for those neighborhoods by reducing the impact of wide roads, and offering transportation solutions for local residents and employees.”

WOODLAND & EASTLAKE PARK

Using the existing roadway and curbing, a restriping project will also affect Washington and Jefferson streets — adding bike lanes to the gap between 7th Avenue and 7th Street.

Lanes currently exist just outside the “Sevens” going west toward the Woodland neighborhood, and east toward Eastlake Park. This would connect cyclists from those neighborhoods to the downtown business district, at no detriment to vehicle traffic.

“In a tight urban area, bikes get a lot of people around and cause no congestion,” Klocke said. “Bike lanes are an important quality-of-life amenity for those who enjoy it, but also a critical infrastructure piece for those who don’t have a car.”

Many of the projects impacting downtown neighborhoods are still open for public comment. For more information on how to get involved or attend a meeting, check the City of Phoenix website.

 

7 historic Phoenix landmarks that no one remembers

7 historic Phoenix landmarks that no one remembers

 by 

historic,phoenix,landmarks,real,estate

When the Central Avenue Dairy began in the early 20th Century between Central and 3rd Avenue, north of Thomas, the city limits for Phoenix ended at Van Buren.

They are all historic Phoenix landmarks. They were centers for the community long before Phoenix became the fifth-biggest city in the country. They have all been replaced by various commercial real estate projects, but they created memories for all who visited them. Here are seven historic Phoenix landmarks that very few people remember.

Weems Turkey Ranch

The ranch was built around the time Arizona became a state in 1912.  It was surrounded by a six-foot granite wall.  The ranch covered about 80 acres and was located at 7th Avenue and Camelback.  It extended from 7th Avenue to 11th Avenue to the west and from Camelback to Colter to the north.  The ranch house faced east and sat about 150 feet north of Camelback and 100 feet west of 7th Avenue. Weems had hundreds of turkeys and also had chickens, geese and goats. Most families in Phoenix at the time bought their Thanksgiving Turkeys there.

Today: The area is home to an LA Fitness, Fry’s and other retail shops and restaurants.

Central Avenue Dairy

The dairy began in the early 1900’s and ran from Earl to just south of Thomas and from Central to 3rdAvenue (about 46 acres).  We never were bothered much by the smell as there were less than 100 cows at any one time. 

Today: Park Central Mall construction began in 1955, thus ending the run for Central Avenue Dairy.Nearby land was also used to build St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

Phoenix Trap and Skeet Club

Located in Echo Canyon at the base of Camelback Mountain, the Arcadia Neighborhood, it was an ideal place to be.  The club was organized in the 1930s.  In trap shooting, the“clay pigeons” are launched from a single machine away from the shooter.  In skeet shooting, targets are launched from two machines in sideways paths that intersect in front of the shooter. The club hosted the world national competition for many years until 1952, when the club moved to Papago Park.

Milky Way Ranch

The ranch was a gorgeous place to visit — a giant oasis of 320 acres.  It was located between 20th Street to 28th Street and from Camelback to Campbell.  The ranch’s headquarters was located exactly where Trader Joe’s is today. The ranch was built in 1900 and closed down in 1950, but a nine-hole golf course was built on the site in late 1951.   

Today: In 1965, Town and Country Mall was built and it has undergone renovations and a renaissance over the past several years.

Sportsman’s Park

Sportsman’s Park was a 160-acre horse racing track. It had a huge white sign with blue letters that rose high above the entrance at the northeast corner of 7th Avenue and Indian School Road. It extended east to 3rd Avenue and north to Indianola.  The park was built in 1920. By late 1950, the racetrack closed its doors.

Today: The area is home to the entrance of the Melrose Historic District, a post office, fast-food restaurants and residential housing.

Cactus Air Park was an open area of 960 acres.  There was always at least three to five airplanes sitting at the northwest corner of the field. The airplanes did not have a closed hangar.  The area had no street signs until 1957.  All of the 960 acres were hard flat dirt without a single growth of anything.  This was due to the Borate compound the airplanes would spray on the field (Borate was later outlawed in the mid-1960s).  The confines were Shea to Cactus to the north and 32nd Street to 44th Street to the east.  Endless miles of desert extended beyond the confines.Cactus Air Park

Airhaven Airport

Airhaven Airport was built during WW II and was located between 27th Avenue and 35th Avenue just south of Indian School Road.  The runway ran 30 degrees northeast to 30 degrees southwest.  It was bordered on the southwest by Grand Avenue and the northeast by Indian School Road.  The Arizona Canal bordered the airport to the south.  The entrance was just before you got to the intersection of Indian School Road, 35th Avenue and Grand Avenue. 

 

A DAY IN THE LIFE AT CORONADO COMMONS

The lifestyle at CORONADO COMMONS includes experiencing numerous restaurants, shops and a very walkable neighborhood just steps from your door. Coronado Commons 325 E Coronado Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85004

coronado commons,roosevelt,downtown,phoenix,luxury,lifestyleYour wait is over. Finally, a modern community close to all the action. Coronado Commons was developed by Riley/Smith Development, whose principals are highly respected residential developers. Years of experience and dedication have culminated in this livable downtown luxury property. Minutes away from the Light Rail, Phoenix Art Museum, Roosevelt Row, sporting events, entertainment, education, food, and culture.

In the heart of the Midtown area, residents are minutes from the Central Arts District, Downtown Phoenix, Arcadia and much more. With so much just minutes away imagine all of the neighborhood gems you’ll have to enjoy.

Coronado Commons offers its owners the best of both worlds–midtown culture and downtown living, all in the heart of a historic neighborhood. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, event venues, art galleries are all within walking distance. Need to get around town? A few minutes by car or Uber will have you in Downtown Phoenix, Sky Harbor Airport or the Biltmore Corridor. Come see this gem of a new townhome community nestled in the heart of Phoenix.

Midtown
2 bedroom / 2.5 bathroom, 1731 sf

With 2 big bedrooms and 2 1/2 baths, you have everything you need and more in this dynamic space. The Midtown offers the Office/Den/Studio at the ground floor entry; flexible space however you want to use it! The Owners Suite is designed for today with walk–in closet, dual sinks and luxurious shower. As with all our plans, you’ll get large open kitchens, over-sized great–rooms and private patios to complement your new Urban Lifestyle!

Uptown
3 bedroom / 3 bathroom, 2150 sf

Big space for your big life! Uptown offers the Office/Den/Studio with convenience bath; flexible space however you want to use it! These end–unit only 3 bedroom homes deliver the light and views you want. The deluxe Owners Suite offers a large walk–in closet, dual sinks, extra counters and luxurious shower. As with all our plans, you’ll get large open kitchens, over-sized great–rooms and private patios to complement your new Urban Lifestyle!

Residence Features

  • Luxury Finishes
  • 10 ft+ Ceilings
  • Light, Open Interior Spaces
  • Attached Two Car Garages
  • Gas Cooktop and Oven
  • Energy Star Rated

Common Area Amenities

  • Resort Style Pool and Lounge Chairs
  • Covered Outdoor Community Grilling Area
  • Secured courtyard
  • Grass Dog Walk
  • Secured Direct access to
    Safeway and Starbucks
See what your day could look like living at Coronado Commons by calling Laura Boyajian at 602-400-0008 today to arrange a private tour.

Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash music publisher’s estates look to sell prominent Phoenix land

Jan 13, 2017

Land is for sale at the southwest corner of Indian School Road and Central Avenue in midtown Phoenix neighboring Willo Historic District, Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District, FQ Story, Alvarado and Ashland Place districts.

That is one of the busiest intersections in the region and is also on the Metro light rail systems. The land is owned by real estate entities managed by trusts of the Aberbach family.

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Richard Nixon and Elvis Presley

Julian J. Aberbach, who died in 2004, was the music publisher for Elvis Presley. Music publishers do deals related to song writing and royalties when compositions are used.

Public records and real estate databases show land at the Indian School/Central land is owned by Aberbach Investments LLC and Vembec LLC.

Those entities are managed by estates for Julian J. Aberbach and his family.

Greg Vogel’s Land Advisors Organization is marketing the land.

The corner was previously home to an AM/PM gas station which is no longer there, parking lots and a Yoshi’s restaurant.

Vogel said the land for sale totals approximately 3 acres with an asking price of $50 per square foot.

Vogel sees the Indian School/Central land as a good spot for a new apartment development.

Julian Aberbach and his late brother Joachim Jean Aberbach were in the music publishing business and forged deals with Elvis Presley, Ray Charles and Johnny Cash.

Julian Aberbach died in 2004 at age 95.

The New York Times outlined in his obituary the business ties to Presley whom he first forged a deal with in 1955. That included telling Presley to hire songwriters to provide him more music.

“I gave Elvis a check for $2,500, an advance against the royalties of his stock ownership,’’ Aberbach said in a 2002 interview with Billboard magazine according to the Times obit. “And he promptly went to the Cadillac dealer and got a pink one.”

Elvis first appeared on the “Ed Sullivan Show” in 1956.

Land Advisors is a leading real estate firm in the state and region. Vogel’s group forged the deal that is bringing Lennar-developed apartments to the northwest corner of McDowell Road and Central Avenue.

10 Housing Markets to Envy in 2017

DAILY REAL ESTATE NEWS | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 01, 2016

Housing Forecast Chart for 2017The national housing market is largely predicted to moderate in 2017, but a handful of metros are expected to beat expectations. In fact, 10 markets are looking like hot-beds for growth in the new year with Phoenix, Arizona being number one.

Realtor.com®’s research team has flagged markets that will likely see average price gains of 5.8 percent and sales growth of 6.3 percent in 2017. Those gains would exceed next year’s anticipated national growth of 3.9 percent in home prices and 1.9 percent in home sales.

As such, real estate professionals in these 10 markets should expect a booming business in 2017. Realtor.com® notes these are the hottest housing markets to watch in the new year, based on price and sales gains:

1. PhoenixMesaScottsdale, Ariz.

2. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, Calif.

3. Boston-Cambridge-Newton, Mass.-N.H.

4. Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, Calif.

5. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif.

6. Jacksonville, Fla.

7. Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Fla.

8. Raleigh, N.C.

9. Tucson, Ariz.

10. Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Ore.-Wash.

Why are expectations so high for these 10 markets? Realtor.com®’s research team notes that strong local economies and population growth are helping to fuel sales. Also, the top 10 housing markets have other commonalities, such as relatively affordable rental prices, low unemployment, and large populations of millennials and baby boomers.

Top Housing Trends for 2017
Next year’s predicted slowing price and sales growth, increasing interest rates and changing buyer demographics are setting the stage for five key housing trends:

  1. Millennials and boomers will dominate the market – Next year, the housing market will be in the middle of two massive demographic waves, millennials and baby boomers – that will power demand for at least the next 10 years. Although increasing interest rates have prompted realtor.com® to lower its prediction of millennial market share to 33 percent of the buyer pool; millennials and baby boomers will still comprise the majority of the market. Baby boomers are expected to make up 30 percent of buyers in 2017 and given they’re less dependent on financing, they are anticipated to be more successful when it comes to closing.
  2. Midwestern cities will continue to be hotbeds for millennials – Midwestern cities are anticipated to continue to beat the national average in millennial purchase market share in 2017 with Madison, Wis.; Columbus, Ohio; Omaha, Neb.; Des Moines, Iowa; and Minneapolis, leading the pack. This year, average millennial market share in these markets is 42 percent, far higher than the U.S. average of 38 percent. With strong affordability in 15 of the 19 largest Midwestern markets, realtor.com® expects this trend to continue in 2017 even as interest rates increase.
  3. Slowing price appreciation – Nationally, home prices are forecast to slow to 3.9 percent growth year over year, from an estimated 4.9 percent in 2016. Of the top 100 largest metros in the country, 26 markets are expected to see price acceleration of 1 percent point or more with GreensboroHigh Point, N.C.; Akron, Ohio; and BaltimoreColumbiaTowson, Md., experiencing the largest gains.  Likewise, 46 markets are expected to see a slowdown in price growth of 1 percent or more with LakelandWinter Haven, Fla., DurhamChapel Hill, N.C.; and Jackson, Miss., undergoing the biggest shift to slower price appreciation.
  4. Fewer homes on the market and fast moving markets – Inventory is currently down an average of 11 percent in the top 100 metros in the U.S. The conditions that are limiting home supply are not expected to change in 2017. Median age of inventory is currently 68 days in the top 100 metros, which is 14 percent – or 11 days – faster than U.S. overall.
  5. Western cities will continue to lead the nation in prices and sales – Western metros in the U.S. are forecast to see a price increase of 5.8 percent and sales increase of 4.7 percent, much higher than the U.S. overall. These markets also dominate the ranking of the realtor.com® 2017 top housing markets, making up five of the top 10 markets on the list (Los Angeles, Sacramentoand Riverside, Calif., Tucson, Ariz., and Portland, Ore.) and 11 of the top 25 (Colorado Springs, Colo.; San Diego; Salt Lake City; ProvoOrem, Utah; Seattle. and OxnardThousand OaksVentura, Calif.)

REPORT: Phoenix Ranked Second-Best Metro Area For Homeowners

Bankrate.com Aug 31, 2016

The Phoenix metro area is the second-best in the nation for homeowners, according to a Bankrate.com report released Wednesday.

phoenix,az,market report,real estate,historic,bestPortland, Phoenix, Atlanta, Las Vegas and Minneapolis/St. Paul round out the best metropolitan areas for homeowners, according to the report. Bankrate.com is a leading aggregator of financial rate information and this marks their first time releasing such a report.

The study reviewed eight factors: home affordability; price appreciation; property taxes; homeowners’ insurance, energy and maintenance costs; foreclosures and how rapidly rents rose over the past six years for which data are available.

Phoenix ranked high on the list for several reasons, including strong home-price appreciation, few foreclosures and inexpensive homeowners’ insurance, according to the report.

“Phoenix was one of the best cities in all the categories we looked at,” said Claes Bell, Bankrate.com analyst. “We were looking to see which cities were the best for attainability, sustainability, affordability and if there was a rewarding financial benefit to owning a home in these areas.”

The Phoenix area scores fifth lowest on the scale of rent hedging, which is a way of measuring rent increases compared with the home price appreciation. In Phoenix, house prices have also been rising faster than rents over the past five years, contributing to the Valley’s high ranking. The Phoenix metro area had the tenth highest energy cost among the 50 metro areas, a reflection of high air conditioning bills during the summer months, according to Bankrate.com.

Home values plunged during the housing bust, but now they are recovering, according to Bankrate.com, and the pace of home appreciation in Phoenix in the last five years is second fastest among the 50 largest metro areas.

The greater Phoenix area also has bounced back from the foreclosure crisis. For the last three years the city has had the second lowest foreclosure rate among top metro areas.

“Builders stopped building during the housing bubble and now demand beats out supply,” Bell said. “Phoenix is no different in that way from the rest of the country. What’s different is the property tax rate and the affordability of the home itself. In cities like New York and L.A., housing costs are half to three-quarters of a person’s annual income.”

Strong home-price appreciation over the past five years is a common thread in Phoenix, Atlanta and Las Vegas. The Twin Cities’ best housing attributes are strong home-price appreciation and a dearth of foreclosures.

Hartford, Connecticut ranks last because of high carrying costs: It has above-average property tax, energy, homeowners’ insurance and maintenance fees. The New York City metro area is second-worst due to high property taxes, minimal home-price appreciation and expensive maintenance costs. Only Los Angeles (fourth-worst) prevented a northeastern sweep of the bottom five (Providence is third-worst and Buffalo is fifth from the rear), according to the report.

“Major cities in the middle of the country did really well in this ranking,” Bell said in a press release. “Out of the top 15 metro areas, only one is within 250 miles of an ocean. Homeowners in America’s largest coastal cities face a number of challenges, ranging from sky-high mortgage payments gobbling up an outsized portion of homeowners’ incomes to high property insurance rates, especially in hurricane-prone areas, and our ranking reflects that.

It’s a terrific time to buy or sell a home in the Phoenix Metro area.