Tag Archives: Historic Modern

Historic Phoenix Home Tours for Winter and Spring 2017

Visit historical homes in Revival, Norman and bungalow styles in the Coronado Historic District near downtown Phoenix in this tour’s 30th year along with Encanto-Palmcroft, Cave Creek and more.

Need a little inspiration to get your home and yard in shape? Home and garden tours are a great way to get home-improvement ideas while discovering new parts of the Valley. Check out our list, which leads into peak home-tour season in spring 2017.

2/12: 29th Annual Willo Historic Home Tour and Street Fair

English Tudor Home In Willo District Phoenix

An Example of an English Tudor In Willo Historic District

With over 900 homes, Willo is Phoenix’s biggest historic district. Once a year, Willo opens its doors to visitors with around 12 homes and the historic firehouse available to tour. The event also includes a classic car show, a beer and wine garden and a street fair with local vendors.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12. Willo Historic District, Third Avenue and West Monte Vista Road, Phoenix. $18. willohistoricdistrict.com.

2/26: Coronado Home & Garden Tour: Historically Modern

1930 Coronado Historic District Tudor

Built in 1930 in the Coronado Historic District

Visit historical homes in Revival, Norman and bungalow styles in the Coronado Historic District near downtown Phoenix in this tour’s 30th year. A street fair featuring local vendors, food trucks, bicycles and classic cars is part of the celebration.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26. Coronado Park, 1717 N. 12th St., Phoenix. $17 online, $20 day of; $5 for ages 5-12, free for 4 and under. thecoronadoneighborhood.com.

3/12: Cave Creek Homes and Garden Tour

cave creek, az,historic,tour,history,real,estateFour contemporary and historical homes will open on this self-guided tour. They include the Hamline Residence, which was one of the original five homes built in Carefree, and the Binkovitz Residence, a modest mid-century modern home. No children under age 12 are admitted.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, March 12. Cave Creek Museum,  6140 E. Skyline Drive, Cave Creek. $35 through March 6; $40 after. cavecreekmuseum.com.

3/26: Encanto/Palmcroft Historic Home Tour and Street Fair

Encanto-Palmcroft,Historic,District,street,sign,phoenix

Encanto-Palmcroft Historic District

This stately Phoenix historical district hosts a home tour every two years. Visit several homes and learn about their history. Once you park, a trolley will take you to stops on the tour and to a street fair at Holly Street and 12th Avenue that includes entertainment, food and local vendors. There will also be a 21-and-over raffle.

Details: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, March 26. 2102 N. 12th Ave., Phoenix. $18 advance, $20 day of. encantopalmcroft.org.

4/2: Modern Phoenix Home Tour

For those fascinated with the Valley’s mid-century modern architecture, this is a must-do event. This year, the tour explores Paradise Gardens. The event has morphed into Modern Phoenix Week, with talks, socials and other activities.

Details: Sunday, April 2. Tickets go on sale Wednesday, Feb. 1. modernphoenixweek.com.

Phoenix Approves Sale of Historic Downtown Building

The city of Phoenix will sell a 101-year-old historic downtown building to a developer for $2.28 million.

Jun 23, 2016

Barrister Building,downtown Phoenix.historic

Barrister Building in downtown Phoenix sale approved and will be renovated

The Arizona Republic reports that the city-owned Barrister Building, which sits on the corner of Jefferson Street and Central Avenue, will be sold to Crescent Bay Development Services LLC. The developer plans to renovate the century-old building, which the city bought in 1990.

Development plans include at least 88 condos in the existing six-story building as well as two new buildings.

This is the latest effort to renovate and preserve the historic building, which originally opened in 1915, and at one time was the tallest building in the state. The city had approved another project plan two years ago but it eventually fell through.

The building was long home to the Jefferson Hotel, featured in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 movie “Psycho.”

“We’re really excited about the project,” said Geoff Beer, a principal with Scottsdale-based Crescent Bay.

Beer said plans calls for construction of two new six-story buildings to go along with the six-story, 100-year-old Barrister building. The Jefferson Hotel/Barrister building was built in 1915.

Beer expects condos to be priced between $250,000 and $650,000 with an average unit size of 1,170 square feet. He said Crescent’s bid calls for buying the city-owned building for $2.28 million. It will also include some ground level retail and restaurant space.

Phoenix could reimburse Crescent Bay up to $1.9 million for infrastructure and preservation improvements, according to the Republic.

Coronado Historic District In Central Phoenix

CORONADO HISTORIC DISTRICT

Coronado Historic Bungalow Photo circa 1935

1935 Coronado Historic District Home

Coronado Historic District boundaries are roughly Virginia Avenue to Coronado Road, 8th Street to 14th Street and houses one of the largest city parks being Coronado Park at 12th Street & Palm Lane. Coronado is walking distance to loads of unique, independently owned restaurants, coffee shops, cafes and shops.

Coronado Historic District Homes For Sale

Fun Facts: The Coronado Historic District covers a bit more than a half square mile. It was designated historic in November, 1986.

Coronado Historic District in Phoenix is another Arizona neighborhood to land on the Best Old House Neighborhoods List for 2010 by This Old House.

Architectural Styles and Square Footage: 1920’s Tudor’s, Craftsman Bungalows and 1940’s Ranch homes with two bedrooms and one bathroom from 700 square feet to about 1,000 square feet are the dominant home sizes in Coronado but it’s certainly not limited to that as you can find a wide variety of homes with 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms ranging from around 1,200-1,500 square feet. terrific wide porches and decent lot sizes with mature trees make Coronado homes ideal for entertaining.

If you like Coronado, you’ll want to check out Country Club Park and Brentwood Historic Districts.

From This Old House:
Coronado Historic District, Phoenix

Once Phoenix had ensured its long-term survival by damming up the Salt River in the early 1900’s, developers got down to the business of plotting the future of the growing Southwestern city, and that future was all about suburbs. By 1920 one of the largest was the Coronado neighborhood, home to a middle-class population of merchants, policemen, and railroad engineers living in modest bungalows and Tudor Revival cottages, many fronted by small lots with towering palm trees. These days the nabe is drawing a young, artsy crowd, who like to hang out on their front porches and wave to neighbors who pass by. The neighborhood was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Each spring, residents show off their homes—and often their DIY handiwork—during an annual house tour and community festival.

The Houses In Coronado

Small to medium-size Tudor, Craftsman, and Ranch houses, built from about 1920 to 1940, are predominant. Prices start at around $150,000 – $175,000. Houses often include a freestanding garage out back with matching architectural details. During the Great Depression, many residents converted their garage into an apartment, moved in, and rented their home.

Why Buy Now?

The neighborhood’s affordability is outstanding. And while there are still a few dilapidated houses, most are in pretty good shape. Buy a house here and all you’ll need to do is pick out the furniture and add a fresh coat of paint.

Among the best for: Bargains, City Life, Easy Commute, First-Time Home Buyers, Singles.

Coronado Historic District Homes For Sale

Read the History of Coronado Historic District

North Encanto Historic District In Central Phoenix

NORTH ENCANTO HISTORIC DISTRICT

The purpose of North Encanto Neighborhood Association (NENA) is to preserve & enhance the historic character of the North Encanto Neighborhood & to improve the quality of life for its residents  by creating a safe, vibrant & engaged community. Period of Significance: 1939-1956.

French Provincial Ranch North Encanto

A 1947 French Provincial Ranch In North Encanto

North Encanto Historic District is generally bounded by 19th Avenue on the West, 15th Avenue on the East, Thomas Road on the South, and Osborn Road on the North housing almost one square mile of historic homes. This neighborhood is close to freeways, I-17, I-10, a very short drive to downtown Phoenix and even a shorter drive (or walkable) to the light rail. There are 456 homes in this this district. North Encanto illustrates the residential development trends of the 1939 -1956 period.

North Encanto is my personal, current historic district residence. I can tell you first hand that it is one of the most wonderful historic districts this city has to offer! On a daily basis, you’ll see residents walking their dogs, walking with their kids (and more dogs), jogging, playing and just hanging out for a good, friendly chat. So many of us neighbors know each other and continue to get to know each other. We have many neighborhood functions from Groundhog Day parties, Christmas & New Year’s gatherings, Halloween parties, joint neighborhood block yard sales and a bunch of other street festivities where we actually block off a street while food vendors attend along with our local fire fighters and more. Games are played by all the wonderful children while the adults hang out, laugh, eat, drink and get to know each other more & more. We look out for one another, watch each others pets, homes and whatever is needed and wanted which keeps a tight knit community.

North Encanto Historic District Homes For Sale

Architectural Styles and Square Footage: North Encanto is red brick heaven loaded with 1940’s and 1950’s Mediterranean Ranch Style Homes, Mid-Century Ranches ranging from less than 1,000 square feet to 2,800 square feet. This district is predominantly comprised of Transitional Ranch-style houses with the largest concentration of intact Transitional/Early Ranch-style homes in metropolitan Phoenix, perhaps even in all of Arizona. But, there are also has a variety of Pueblo Revivals plus three Art Moderne homes. Many of these gorgeous homes have 1 to 2 car detached garages, detached studios, guest houses and lot sizes with room to make it your own. Many of these homes still boast the 2-color, original tile combo with colors that you just don’t see anymore like peach and black, pink and black, powder blue and black, pink and green and peach and green. There are also many, many homes here that have extremely modern interiors while keeping historic integrity. These are must see homes.

If you like North Encanto, you’ll probably like Campus Vista Historic District which is just east of 15th Avenue, Del Norte Place near 15th Avenue and Encanto Blvd., and, Country Club Park Historic District near 7th Street and Thomas Road.

Homes For Sale In North Encanto Historic District

History of North Encanto Historic District

Arcadia Historic Neighborhood In Midtown Phoenix Arizona

The Arcadia neighborhood is one of the most desirable addresses in Phoenix.

Camelback Mountain Arcadia Historic Neighborhood

Camelback Mountain is prominently seen from many homes in the Historic Arcadia Neighborhoods

I personally lived in Arcadia starting in 1989 as the first house I purchased was in this eclectic neighborhood. I had a stunning view of Camelback Mountain in my back yard like so many homes in Arcadia do. In fact, you’d be hard pressed to find a home that doesn’t have a view of Camelback Mountain, at least to some degree. I can attest to all the wonderful attributes Arcadia has to offer but don’t take my word for it; get in your car and go cruise the area. You’ll fall in love with it.

Arcadia is bounded by 44th Street to 68th Streets and from Indian School Road to Camelback Mountain. Immediate surrounding areas have more recently been referenced as Lower Arcadia or the Arcadia area but the true Arcadia corridor begins at the corner of 44th Street and Indian School Road going north and east from there. Contrary to many people trying to ride on the “Arcadia” name, there is indeed a true, defined Arcadia Corridor.

Arcadia neighborhood is not officially a historic district and its eastern edge is in the City of Scottsdale but Arcadia has more than earned its huge place in Phoenix history.

Arcadia Homes For Sale

Arcadia is one of the most desirable and priciest addresses in Phoenix. The homes range from small ranch houses under 1,000 Square feet to stunning luxury estates that sit on five acres with a lot of in-between. You’ll find a wide variety of architectural styles from sprawling 4 to 5-bedroom ranches built in the postwar era to Revivals and Pueblo-style homes dating to the late 1920’s and early 1930’s

The neighborhood is surrounded by original luxury guest resorts along Camelback Road like the Royal Palms and is walking distance to many trending restaurants are bars such as The Vig, LaGrande Orange Grocery and Pizzeria, Postino’s Wine Cafe, Zipps, The Arcadia Tavern, the famous Pete’s Fish and Chips and so much more! Eating and drinking your way around Arcadia is fun and can take some time.

Many people now refer to Arcadia as Midtown as it’s in the middle of everything superb and its overall location is in the center of it all. Sky Harbor Airport is just a hop and a skip away as is Biltmore Fashion Park, Fashion Square in Scottsdale and Paradise Valley along with a plethora of fantastic golf courses! Downtown and Central Phoenix is just a very short jaunt as is I-10, the Loop 202, the 51 and the 143.

Arcadia Park, G.R. Herberger Park, Camelback Mountain (and its hiking trails) along with easy access to the canal gives many options for hiking, jogging, biking and walking.

Arcadia is also known for its top tier public schools (some of the best in the state) such as Hopi Elementary School, Ingleside Middle School and Arcadia High School in the Scottsdale Unified School District making it an extremely family friendly community. There are also private schools in the area.

This is the type of neighborhood where the neighbors know each other, walk their dogs and are out with their children enjoying the tranquility this wonderful neighbor offers!

Arcadia homes have character, are well-kept and have high property values as the neighborhood is adjacent to the upscale suburbs of Paradise Valley, the Biltmore area, Scottsdale and North Central Phoenix. Most lawn have lush, green lawns, custom landscaping, palm trees and citrus trees galore!

Built on former citrus groves, Arcadia is known for well-irrigated, mature landscaping. Several yards prominently feature orange, lemon and grapefruit trees as reminders of the area’s past. The area used to be occupied by citrus farmers from 1919 to the mid-1950’s. In the mid-1950’s, the rest of Phoenix caught up with the farms and the area suburbanized with characteristic ranch homes on large lots. Arcadia High School serves and derives its name from the neighborhood.

The film, Everything Must Go, takes place in Arcadia.

In 2002, CNNMoney voted Arcadia as one of the “Best Places To Live” stating:

In stark contrast to Ahwatukee’s desert foliage are the lush green lawns of Arcadia, a neighborhood that sits on the Phoenix and Scottsdale city line. Arcadia is a former orange grove with its own irrigation system, and rows of citrus trees line its blocks of quaint homes built in the 1950’s and 1960’s on large lots.

Because Arcadia is so highly regarded for its greenery and high-performance schools, which are in the Scottsdale system, prices are on the high end: Starter homes begin at $300,000. Homeowners tend to do a lot of remodeling, adding much diversity to the once similar-looking homes; it’s not uncommon to see a country cottage adjacent to a Spanish hacienda. Residents brag about being close to Scottsdale’s high-end shopping, a world-class resort, arts centers and good restaurants, as well as downtown Phoenix.

I couldn’t agree more. After all, living in Arcadia for so many years, I’m hooked.

Read the History of Arcadia Historic Neighborhood

Roosevelt Row BID Proposal Faces New Challenges

Since April 2014, Downtown Phoenix Journal has been sharing the story of the developing proposal for a Roosevelt area Enhanced Municipal Services District, more commonly known as a Business Improvement District or BID. 

Roosevelt Row Historic Phoenix

Roosevelt Row, Phoenix, AZ

Over the past 18 months, the Roosevelt Row community has been engaged in the process of forming a business improvement district (BID), which would provide enhanced municipal services for the area. Though the proposal for the BID passed the Phoenix City Council in January, it is now in danger of being invalidated due to a bill that is advancing in the state legislature.

HB 2440 would essentially change the process for the formation of BIDs – not just in downtown Phoenix, but across the state. If passed, it would incorporate more government oversight into the process and would be retroactive to January 1, 2016. The bill is sponsored by Representative Warren Petersen of Gilbert and is supported by a group of Roosevelt Row land owners who oppose the formation of the BID. The bill passed the House this week and is now on its way to the Senate.

Earlier in the week, Roosevelt Row CDC sent a letter to Roosevelt business owners informing them about the bill. The letter is excerpted here:

Dear Roosevelt Row Business Owner,

As many of you are aware, the Phoenix City Council recently approved the formation of a business improvement district for our Roosevelt Row area. That vote gives us the opportunity to create an organization that represents us, the small business owners of Roosevelt Row, to collectively market our area as an evolving canvas of creativity. By forming this district we will be able to promote arts, music, dining and shopping opportunities which will increase business and community awareness of Roosevelt Row as a culturally diverse destination welcoming to everyone.

To be clear, the Council’s vote to approve the District is contingent upon us working together to develop by-laws and a budget which reflects our priorities in a fiscally responsible manner. Once those documents are completed the City Council will then review, modify, and/or approve what we submit.

While we are currently in the process of developing those items (budget and by-laws), a lobbying firm, which recently purchased a building on Roosevelt Row, is using its influence to retroactively stop our district from being formed and essentially prohibiting any future Business Improvement Districts from ever being organized again. Public Policy Partners, a lobbying firm owned and operated in part by lobbyist Marcus Dell’Artino, has successfully gotten a Gilbert lawmaker to introduce House Bill 2440, which would essentially prohibit any types of these organizations from ever being organized again anywhere in Arizona! And the bill is retroactively dated to the date our district was approved by Phoenix City Council.

Currently business improvement districts are successfully operating in Downtown Phoenix, Tempe, Mesa, Chandler, Tucson and Flagstaff – they have been highly effective in revitalizing these urban core areas by recruiting, retaining and expanding locally-owned and independently operated small businesses and promoting these areas as unique cultural, artistic and commercial destinations. They have proven to be powerful economic engines to spur business and job growth.

If you agree with the Roosevelt Row CDC and would like to voice your support for the BID, follow this link to contact members of the Arizona Legislature: http://www.rooseveltrow.org/save-roosevelt-row/

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Housing Affordability Still High, For Now

DAILY REAL ESTATE NEWS | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 02, 2016

Home prices may have been on the rise the last few years, but homes are still more affordable now than they were in the pre-bubble years, according to the latest Mortgage Monitor Report released by Black Knight Financial Services.

Households are using 21 percent of the national median income to pay a mortgage on a median-priced home. In 2000-2002, the average payment-to-income ratio was 26 percent, and in 2006, it was 33 percent.

However, Black Knight’s report warns that if home prices continue to increase – as they have year-over-year for 43 consecutive months – the affordability picture in home ownership could start to change in two years.

Black Knight factored in a continuing 5.5 percent annual home price appreciation as well as interest rate rises of 50 basis points a year. Under that scenario, “we see that in two years home affordability will be pushing the upper bounds of that pre-bubble average,” says Ben Graboske, senior vice president at Black Knight Data and Analytics. “At the state level under that same scenario, eight states would be less affordable than 2000-2002 levels within 12 months and 22 states would be within 24 months.”

Graboske notes that Hawaii and Washington, D.C., in particular, are already less affordable than they were during the pre-bubble era. On the other hand, he says, even after 24 months under this scenario, Michigan – and a few other states – would still be much more affordable by the end of 2017 than it was in the early 2000s.

Within 12 months, the average mortgage payment is expected to rise by $114, which would then require 24 percent of a household’s monthly income – still below the 2000-2002 levels, according to Black Knight. But by the end of 2017, monthly mortgage payments are expected to be $240 more than today, which would push the tally to 26.5 percent of a household’s income and the upper levels of the pre-bubble averages, the report notes.

If you’re on the fence and are thinking about buying a home in Phoenix, please call Laura B.

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Downtown and Central Phoenix Life Becoming a Nationwide Hotspot

DOWNTOWN LIFE

The Downtown Phoenix Condo and Loft Scene

Metro Light Rail, Phoenix, AZ

Metro Light Rail In Downtown Phoenix

The number of high-rises, mid-rises and low-rises being built, restored and renovated have been absolutely BOOMING in Central Phoenix! These buildings are old mixed in with new and provide amenities galore. Downtown Phoenix is the new home of loft traditions where space and creativity have been merging into stylistic, personalized urban expression. Many industrial buildings have been converted into desirable, luxurious, lofts or condominiums for your taking. If a single-family home is not for you but simple living is, (no yard responsibilities, etc.), then you’ve come to the right place. Or maybe you’re an artist looking to live where you work. I have ideas for you.

Here, you will find real-time, live listings of all Downtown, Central and North Phoenix condos for sale, Urban Lofts for sale, Condos in High-Rises for sale, and pretty much any dwelling type that is not a single-family home. Whether you wish to buy, sell, renovate or design a loft or condominium in Phoenix, HistoricPhoenixDistricts.com and Downtown Life has the property and solution for you.

Downtown and Central Phoenix is fun urban living. It is a series of distinct urban and historical phoenix neighborhoods where neighbors know each other and are constantly welcoming new neighbors as the downtown area continues its growth.

Downtown Phoenix and the Central Avenue Corridor has enjoyed tremendous growth since the completion of light rail and ASU opening its Downtown Phoenix Campus.

You can walk for coffee, breakfast, lunch, dinner, drinks and entertainment including the First Friday Art Walk, museums, sporting events, shopping, parks and more. It is a place populated by people seeking a way of life that doesn’t require hours of commuting each day. Many people enjoy driving any one of the many Historic Phoenix Districts just to view the architectural designs of the beautiful homes that encompass Phoenix Historic neighborhoods.

While downtown Phoenix grows, you can and experience urban living at its best. No matter what your taste there are homes that will make you happy. Live in an area full of cultural venues and experience the convenience a downtown residence can provide whether in a modern or historic condominium, historic loft, or a townhome. Come be part of downtown life.

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